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1929-1930 General Report of the President

1929-1930 General Report For The Year

To the Honorable, The Board of Visitors of the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College and Polytechnic Institute:

Gentlemen:

I have the honor to submit the following general report of the institution for the year which began July 1, 1929, and ended June 30, 1930:

Board Of Visitors

Dr. J. G. Ferneyhough, a member of the Board since January, 1929, died suddenly on March 4, 1930, at his home in Chesterfield County. He was an alumnus of this college, a former member of the faculty, and always greatly interested in the institution. As a state official during a long period of years he rendered faithful service.

To fill the vacancy caused by this death, the Governor appointed Hon. W. Stuart Moffett, an alumnus of the college, for the remainder of the term extending to July 1, 1932.

Changes In Staff

Death: W. G. Conner, professor of mechanic arts and director of the shops.

Leaves Of Absence: I. D. Wilson, professor of zoology and animal pathology, 1929-30; Martha D. Dinwiddie, associate professor of home economics and adviser to women students, fall and winter quarters, 1929-30; J. F. D. Smith, assistant professor of engineering drawing, 1929-30; D. A. Tucker, assistant horticulturist, Agricultural Extension Division, 1929-30; J. F. Eheart, assistant chemist, Agricultural Experiment station, July-December, 1929.

Resignations And Expiration Of Terms: W. R. Nichols, professor of military science and tactics and commandant of cadets; F. A. Motz, horticulturist, Agricultural Extension Division, professor of pomology; W. M. Chapin, associate professor of military science and tactics, assistant commandant of cadets; T. R. Aaron, assistant professor of military science and tactics, assistant commandant of cadets; A. N. Tanner, Jr., assistant professor of military science and tactics, assistant commandant of cadets; N. P. Lawrence, Jr., assistant professor of English; A. F. Gustafson, assistant professor of physical education; E. F. Davis, assistant plant physiologist, Agricultural Experiment Station; R. G. Matheson, assistant professor of English; G. A. Moore, instructor in physical education; R. G. Sasscer, instructor in geology; L. D. Lasting, acting assistant chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station; T. A. Keck, instructor in physics; L. Whitt, assistant librarian; A. Whittener, assistant librarian.

Promotions: H. C. Groseclose, professor of agricultural education; F. H. Fish, professor of analytical chemistry; R. E. Hussey, professor of organic chemistry; J. E. Lodewick, professor of wood technology; James Godkin, associate plant pathologist, Agricultural Extension Division; J. B. Jones, associate professor of applied mechanics and experimental engineering; J. A. Waller, Jr., associate agricultural engineer, Agricultural Extension Division; Gordon Elcan, associate state club agent, Agricultural Extension Division; Mary B. McGowan, specialist in home economics, Agricultural Extension Division; C. H. Jenkins, associate professor of history; W. H. Byrne, associate agronomist, Agricultural Extension Division; F. W. HofMann, associate horticulturist, Agricultural Experiment Station; J. L. Scott, associate professor of military science and tactics, assistant commandant of cadets; A. H. Teske, associate horticulturist, Agricultural Extension Division; J. H. Wild, associate professor of French and German; R. H. McNeil, associate professor of English, director of publications; R. L. Humbert, executive secretary, associate professor of economics, manager of bureau of community development; D. A. Tucker, assistant horticulturist, Agricultural Extension Division; J. F. Eheart, assistant chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station; W. T. Hartman, Jr., assistant professor of civil engineering; J. A. Addlestone, assistant professor of chemistry; P. H. McGauhey, assistant professor of civil engineering; N. W. Conner, assistant professor of applied mechanics and experimental engineering; L. E. Starr, assistant professor of zoology and animal pathology; B. O. Miller, assistant professor of economics; .J. H. Hall, assistant professor of English and Spanish; J. L. Maxton, assistant agricultural economist, Agricultural Experiment Station; M. S. Kipps, assistant agronomist, Agricultural Experiment Station, assistant professor of agronomy.

Appointments: J. B. Maynard, professor of military science and tactics, commandant of cadets; P. T. Norton, Jr., professor of industrial engineering, manager of industrial service bureau; H. S. Grenoble, associate professor of industrial engineering, manager of bureau of engineering extension instruction; F. J. Sette, associate professor of sanitary engineering; R. G. Henderson, assistant plant pathologist, Agricultural Experiment Station; W. H. Humbert, specialist in surveys; R. E. Hill, assistant professor of military science and tactics, assistant commandant of cadets; E. V. Macatee, assistant professor of military science and tactics, assistant commandant of cadets; W. C. Bennett, Jr., assistant professor of military science and tactics, assistant commandant of cadets; H. H. Gordon, assistant professor of agricultural engineering, assistant specialist in agricultural engineering, Agricultural Extension Division; J. T. Allen, assistant professor of business administration; P. C. Scherer, Jr., assistant professor of organic chemistry; Frank Marshall, Jr., assistant professor of economics; W. L. Threlkeld, acting assistant professor of zoology; J. P. Mahaney, assistant professor of industrial engineering, manager of shops; A. B. Groves, assistant plant pathologist, Agricultural Experiment Station; S. C. Andrews, specialist in surveys; P. T. Gish, acting instructor in agronomy; D. M. Kohler, instructor in English; K. J. Belser, instructor in architectural engineering; H. H. Waesche, instructor in geology; R. S. Warren, instructor in physical education; J. F. Watson, assistant horticulturist, Agricultural Extension Division; L. Justice, assistant librarian; B. Allen, assistant librarian; L. T. Drewry, assistant librarian.

Death Of Major John T. Cowan

On October 8, 1929, Major John T. Cowan, of Montgomery County, died. Major Cowan was a member of the first Board of Visitors of this institution. He represented Montgomery County in the General Assembly of Virginia, and took a great interest in the establishment of the college at Blacksburg.

Death Of Professor Conner

It is my sad duty to officially report the death on September 28, 1929, of Professor W. G. Conner, head of our department of mechanic arts. Professor Conner had been connected with the institution continuously for thirty-seven years following his graduation here; and during this long period he rendered the most efficient, loyal, and faithful service. He was highly esteemed by all who knew him. His sound judgment, his never-failing response to every call, his high standards, and his numerous fine qualities of manhood, not only brought him the respect of all who came in contact with him, but also endeared him to his fellow-workers, so that his loss will be most keenly felt. He had a most important and valuable part in the development of our physical plant, and his works stand in such permanent form in our midst that they will serve ever to remind us of him.

Commencement, 1930

At Commencement this year degrees were conferred upon 227 students as compared with 195 in 1929. These were distributed as follows, the 1929 figures being shown in parentheses:

Agriculture47 (37)
Engineering111 (99)
Business Administration42 (32)
Applied Science8 (10)
  B.S. Degrees208 (178)
  M.S    ”15 (9)
  C.E.    ”2 (2)
  E.E.    ”2 (4)
  M.E.    ”(2)
      Total227 (195)

The alumni reunions at this Commencement were more satisfactory than ever before, and more largely attended. More than 500 registered. The success is due largely to the adoption of the Dix plan, which selects a group of thirteen classes for each year’s reunion, bringing together men who were at college together during four-year periods. Far more interest was shown than ever before on such occasions.

A special feature of the Commencement this year was the alumni presentation of a bronze tablet and an oil portrait of Colonel William M. Patton, to be placed in Patton Engineering Hall.

Summer Activities

During the last few years activities on the campus during the summer months have been increasing rapidly, so that this year they are more largely attended and more varied in type than before. These activities are distributed throughout the summer months in such a way as to utilize our facilities almost without cessation during every week of the year.

The summer quarter class program registered more students than in any previous year. As our courses are technical in character we do not duplicate the work of the other six state institutions conducting summer schools, and we make no attempt to have large numbers of teachers in attendance.

Our schedule for the summer includes, in addition to the regular college classes, the following: electric metermen’s course; rally of agricultural high school students and annual conference of the Future Farmers of Virginia; annual conference of instructors of vocational agriculture in Virginia high schools; 4-H club leaders course and boys’ and girls’ clubs short course; Institute of Rural Affairs and State Farmers Institute. These activities bring more than 4,000 different persons, men and women, boys and girls, to the campus during the summer.

It is believed that activities such as these should be encouraged, not only because they form a means of extending our service to more of the people from various sections of our state, and enable us to use our plant the year around, but also because they enable us to keep our organization in the various service departments intact throughout the year, thus promoting economy and efficiency in management. We do not, of course, attempt to make money out of our guests, but we do require them to pay the full cost of their stay here, so that these activities represent no cost to the institution. On the other hand, the increased interest on the part of our people in this institution is worth much to us.

Certificates Of Merit

It is customary to award each year two certificates of merit to persons who have made outstanding contributions to the development of agriculture in Virginia. These certificates are awarded at the annual Farmers’ Institute in the summer. In accordance with the usual plan, our agricultural faculty nominated four persons for these certificates, from which two were selected by the Board, as follows: Hon. J. B. Watkins, Midlothian, Virginia, and Mr. Frank S. Walker, Orange, Virginia.

Opening Of The Fifty-Eighth Session

Following the practice of the last two years, the three days, September 17-19, were used for the registration and orientation of new students. A program of exercises covering morning, afternoon, and evening of each day was arranged; and practically every student was in place promptly on the first morning. Similar to preceding years the exercises included psychological and placement tests, military drill, lectures by college officials, talks by representatives of various college interests, and recreational features such as music, moving pictures, athletics, and cheering practice. The physical examinations by the health officer, and the routine of registration were practically completed on the first day. About 475 new students were enrolled and given programs during the day. We feel that the time devoted to orientation was well spent, and that the results will be as satisfactory as they have been in the past. The college Y. M. C. A. should be highly commended for its valuable service in connection with the reception of new students. The military department was assisted in the preliminary instruction for new students by a number of the cadet officers who returned a few days in advance of the opening of the session.

Former students were registered on the third day, and classes began the next morning. At the close of the three days of registration, there were 1,236 students on the rolls, as compared with 1,198 the preceding year.

Entrance requirements were rigidly enforced, and as a result a number of applicants were denied admission, although practically all of them were eligible for most of the colleges. Our greatly increased dormitory facilities have enabled us to accommodate the large number of students in a very satisfactory manner. The difficulty we are now facing is in providing sufficient space in the dining hall. It has been necessary to use the assembly hall for additional dining-room space. It is very obvious that a college auditorium is badly needed, there being now no place where student assemblies can be held from time to time during the year, although it is very desirable that they should be frequently held.

Student Enrolment

The enrolment of regular college students during the nine months’ session, 1929-30, was distributed as follows, the figures in parentheses being for the preceding year:

ClassAgricultureEngineeringBusiness
Administration
Applied
Science
Total
Graduate53(39)17(16)1(1)25(14)96(70)
Senior52(47)123(116)50(39)9(12)234(214)
Junior46(48)122(121)41(45)17(10)226(224)
Sophomore59(55)165(150)81(69)22(33)327(307)
Freshman93(85)290(275)121(115)41(31)545(506)
Part-time        12(13)
Total303(274)717(678)294(269)114(100)1,440(1,334)

The total includes 73 (70) women students, 178 (147) nonmilitary men students, and 1,189 (1,117) cadets. In addition to these there were 67 (58) special dairying students enrolled in the winter course. Of this total enrolment in the regular nine months session for students resident in Blacksburg, 1,305 (1,246), or 86.6% (89.5%), were from Virginia; and 202 (146), or 13.5% (10.5%), were from 24 (20) other states; 4 (4) were from other countries. In the list of regular students every county and city in Virginia was represented with the exception of Buchanan County; while in the preceding year seven counties were not represented.

The summer quarter enrolled 304 (289) students, in residence at Blacksburg. Outside of the resident enrolment there were during the year 115 extension students taking non-credit work, and 64,183 men and women, boys and girls, enrolled for extension work in agriculture and home economics through our county agent and club system. Many thousands were, of course, given intermittent instruction through correspondence, printed matter, demonstrations, institutes, etc., the record of attendance at institutes and conferences being more than 200,000. In summer courses for boys and girls there was a total enrolment of 2,743.

Resignations Of Students

In view of the fact that some attention has been directed recently to resignations of students from college soon after the opening of the session, it may be of interest to state that our records for the past six years are quite complete, showing the name, date, and reasons in the case of every student resigning. According to these records, the number of new students resigning in each of the six years is four per cent, with the exception of the year 1926-27, which for some unexplained reason ran as high as seven per cent. Attention is particularly directed to the fact that the percentage this year was not higher than it has been in other years during the six year period. Of the eighteen students leaving during the first two months of the session, four of them left before attending classes. We feel sure that our percentage is comparatively small.

College Band Fraternity

An application was received from the cadet band for authorization to establish a chapter of the national honorary college band fraternity known as Kappa Kappa Psi. It is understood that the requirements for membership in this fraternity are very high, and that such chapters are now in existence at Ohio State University, University of Michigan, Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Pennsylvania State College, University of Washington, Tulane University, and Georgia School of Technology.

John Philip Sousa is the honorary president of this organization. It is understood that this is not a social fraternity, but an honor society which seeks to promote the best in music for college bands, and to encourage students through such recognition to become members of the band and take a pride in such membership. This matter was investigated by the dean of the college and the commandant of cadets, and they both recommended that the request be granted. They believed that this will be an incentive to scholarship, as well as serve to promote the efficiency of the band. [The Board approved, provided the names of the students shall be submitted to the dean of the college for approval before they are elected as members of the organization, and also that the organization be under the general supervision of the commandant of cadets.]

Carnegie Report On Athletics

Considerable attention has been directed through the newspapers to a recent report of the Carnegie Foundation concerning college athletics. I regret very much that this institution was not visited when the study was being made, although information was supplied by mail in compliance with the request of those carrying on the study. We should gladly welcome a thorough inspection of our athletic interests in all directions. We have no athletic scholarship and no fund with which to attract and subsidize athletes. We do not favor athletic students either financially or academically. We see no reason for discriminating against a student because he happens to be an athlete, and students participating in athletics are on exactly the same basis as students who take no part in athletics. Our state scholarships merely cover the tuition fee for Virginians, and are available for all Virginians who are properly prepared to enter college, so that athletics enter in no way into the assignment of these scholarships. We do not have scholarships such as some of the state institutions have, which aid students in meeting other expenses than the tuition fee. Positions for self-help at the college are assigned to students by the dean of the college without reference to their participation in athletics. Of the students whom we assist through student employment and loans, only a very small proportion are athletes, and those few are not assisted because they are athletes, but because they are worthy and in need of financial assistance. We have found that the class records of our students who take a part in athletics are somewhat above the general average, because the eligibility rules of the Southern Conference, of which this institution is a member, prohibit students who fall behind in their class work from taking part in inter-collegiate games. It is, therefore, not usual for a member of the inter-collegiate teams to fall behind in his class work, particularly since those in charge of our athletics take especial pains to see that such students maintain the proper academic standards. Our athletic coaches are members of our college faculty, and are subject to the same salary schedule as other members in the various academic and technical departments.

So far as this institution is concerned I see no reason why we should not want a full investigation, and I believe it would be helpful if such an investigation could be made of all of the colleges in Virginia as regards all phases of athletics, of awarding scholarships, gifts, loans and student jobs, and the use of all funds derived from or connected in any way with athletics. It, of course, is to be presumed that such an investigation would be made by competent and impartial men brought from outside of the State of Virginia, and who have never been in any way connected with the institutions which are being investigated. I believe that good would be accomplished by publishing the results of such an investigation for the information of all who are interested in a college education, and that this would help to remove misapprehensions in the public mind. There are undoubtedly evils in our college athletics, and undesirable features which can and should be eliminated; but the whole situation, at least so far as some of our colleges are concerned, has been greatly exaggerated in the public mind. We do not believe the situation at our college is such as to cause anxiety on the part of those interested in our welfare, but if there should be anything unethical, unsportsmanlike, or otherwise undesirable in athletics at this institution, it would be a favor to us to point it out so that we may promptly correct it. Since our institution was not one of the small number selected for a personal inspection, we are unfortunately placed in the large group which rests in the shadow of suspicion. For that reason I feel that it would have been much better for us if we had been included in the list of institutions inspected, regardless of what might have been the result of such an inspection.

Gifts

Mr. William E. Wine, an alumnus of the class of 1904, now president of the General Alumni Association, has provided funds for the establishment of three scholarships, one to be awarded each year to a Virginia student who has completed the freshman year. The scholarships are good for three years with a stipend of $300 a year each. The award is made by a committee from the college faculty and is on a basis of evidence of need, scholastic record, qualities of manhood, and moral force and character. This constitutes an outstanding gift and one which is greatly appreciated.

Certain other scholarships are being provided by several individuals for use from year to year, but I am not authorized to name the donors. All of these scholarships are rendering real service in assisting worthy young men and women of limited resources to attend college. We trust that others will be prompted to make similar gifts, as the need is great.

Mr. Gordon Lefebvre, an alumnus of the class of 1913, has donated the sum of $10,000 toward the completion of the stadium. With the addition of the concrete seats provided in this way the stadium has a capacity of 9,000. This generous act is of great assistance, and it is hoped that it will inspire others to supply the comparatively small remainder needed to complete the stadium.

The college received, through the administrator of the estate of the late Dr. Steinmetz, the cabinets which he used in his own laboratory at Schenectady. This gift was made to our department of electrical engineering through the interest of our Schenectady alumni. The administrator of the estate was the foster son of Dr. Steinmetz, and we appreciate his recognition of this institution which has sent so many graduates to work with the General Electric Company. Dr. Steinmetz had such a world-wide reputation as a scientist that the associations make these cabinets very valuable for an institution of this type, aside from their intrinsic value, which is considerable. The cabinets are quartered oak, and have been installed in our engineering hall, forming an attractive and useful addition to our equipment.

An Unusual Honor

One of our 4-H club girls, Miss Helen Drinker, of Henrico County, was awarded the U. S. Secretary of Agriculture Trophy as the club girl in the United States best typifying the standard of club work. This silver cup was presented to the girl by Mrs. Herbert Hoover before a large assemblage in Washington, and she was later presented over radio broadcasting system. When it is recognized that competition for this honor was keen and covered the entire country, it is seen that this achievement constitutes high commendation for the efficiency of our extension staff engaged in this important club work with our boys and girls.

Extension Work For Negroes

The extension work for Negroes in Virginia is conducted under the direction of our Agricultural Extension Division, the headquarters for this branch of the work having been maintained at Hampton Institute. A request was received from the Board of Visitors of the Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute that the headquarters of this extension work for Negroes be transferred to that institution. About ten years ago, by direction of Governor Davis, the portion of the federal funds for land grant colleges which had been assigned to the Hampton Institute was transferred to the Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute on the ground that the former institution is not controlled by the State of Virginia, whereas the latter is a strictly state-controlled institution. We communicated with the U. S. Department of Agriculture, under whose direction the extension work is conducted jointly with our Agricultural Extension Division, and were informed by the chief of extension service that no objection would be raised by the federal department to the proposed transfer, if the Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute could meet satisfactorily the requirements of the extension service. Director Hutcheson outlined these requirements, and we were informed by the rector of the Board of Visitors of the Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute that this institution could meet the conditions and carry on the work in an acceptable way.

The Board directed that an inspection of the institution be made by Director Hutcheson with a view to seeing if the facilities available there would be satisfactory. His report being favorable, the transfer of the extension activities for Negroes from Hampton Institute to the Virginia State College for Negroes (the General Assembly of 1930 having changed the name) was promptly effected. The attitude of the authorities of Hampton Institute as to this matter is worthy of high commendation. We are assured that they will continue to give us their hearty cooperation as needed in this work.

Radio Broadcasting

Beginning January 6, 1930, this college has regularly broadcast a program from 12:30 to 1:00 p. m., daily, through Station WDBJ, of Roanoke, by connection with our studios in the tower of the War Memorial Hall. This time has been generously placed at our disposal by the owners of the Roanoke station, the Richardson-Wayland Electrical Corporation. Our studios are fairly well equipped, and there is evidence that our programs reach a large number of people, covering practically every part of Virginia and neighboring states. For the most part our broadcast material represents brief talks by members of the various instructional departments of the college, experiment stations and extension divisions, on subjects lying within their special fields of teaching or research. In addition, musical numbers by campus groups and other local talent, are frequently offered. A carefully worked out and balanced schedule of programs is published at the beginning of each quarter. All who take parts on our programs do so voluntarily and without compensation; and we are grateful to them for their valuable assistance.

Building Projects Completed

During the past year we have completed a number of major physical plant improvements. The central heating and power plant, the largest of these projects, was completed, equipped, and put into operation early in the year. Patton Engineering Hall was completed, partially equipped, and occupied last fall. The dormitory for non-military students was completed, with the exception of the top floor, and occupied during the college year. The University Club completed and occupied its comfortable house. The addition to the student hospital was completed and put into use. Fireproofing of the stairways and corridors in the old barrack buildings was completed during the summer. Our water and sewer lines were considerably extended and in some cases old lines were replaced and enlarged. The remaining unimproved wing of our main dairy barn was remodelled and equipped. A horse barn and two silos for the main dairy barn have been completed. Additional work has been in progress on the stadium, which will soon result in doubling its seating capacity.

Minor improvements and various repair items are too numerous to mention. In a plant of this size and kind a large amount of repair work is necessary every year. Fortunately we have been able to do a fair amount of landscaping and planting on our campus during the year, but the protracted drought has caused considerable injury.

New Building Projects

The budget provides for a dairy products building, a mechanical engineering laboratory, and the completion of the top floor of the non-military dormitory. In a conditional group of appropriations provision is made for a physics building, the first unit of an agricultural engineering building, and certain additions to Davidson Hall; but at this time it appears doubtful as to whether these items will be available.

Contracts have been made for the dairy products building and its fixed equipment, amounting to a total of approximately $160,000, including fees of architects and engineers and bonds required of contractors. To this must be added at least $5,000 for additional equipment. The appropriation being only $150,000, the governor’s authorization was sought to exceed the appropriation by $15,000 with the understanding that this amount would be provided from general operating funds of the institution. This authorization was granted and the construction is now under way.

Contracts have been made for the mechanical engineering laboratory building, amounting to a total of approximately $27,000, including fees of architects. The appropriation for building and equipment is $50,000, so that approximately $23,000 will be available for the equipment, which is naturally very expensive. It is hoped that much of the necessary equipment may be secured by gift or at greatly reduced prices, so that our laboratory will be well equipped. Construction of the building will begin soon.

Contracts have been made for completing the dormitory for non-military students, amounting to a total of approximately $18,000, including fees of architects and engineers. The appropriation, made from funds borrowed on the Noell plan, was $25,000, thus leaving approximately $7,000 for equipping the building and providing other necessary and desirable items. In this way not only the 42 rooms of the top floor will be completed but eight additional rooms will be provided on the first floor, making a total of 108 rooms in this building.

In addition to the amount made available on the Noell plan for the completion of the new dormitory, the sum of $12,500 was provided for improvements in the old barrack buildings, chiefly for the installation of clothes closets in the bedrooms. Contract for this portion of the work was made at a total of $7,500. The remainder of the available amount will be used a little later.

   

Stone Dormitory New Stone Dormitory -- Completed, 1930

   

Patton Hall Patton Engineering Hall -- Occupied, 1929

 

Heating Connections

It is necessary to extend our central heating system lines to the proposed dairy products and agricultural engineering buildings, and in doing so to go by Agricultural Hall and connect that and the Extension Building to the central system. It is also very desirable to connect Davidson Hall with the central system via Agricultural Hall. Unless this be done additional boiler capacity will have to be provided for the additions to Davidson Hall and the proposed Physics Building, and that will be both difficult and expensive.

Proposals received for these heating connections, including electrical ducts, engineers’ fees and estimated contingencies, amounted to a total of approximately $24,000. The available funds for such work amount to $7,000. It was, therefore, decided to make contract for as much of the work as could be done within the sum, and to ask the governor to authorize the use of an amount not to exceed $17,000 from the contingent group of appropriations in the budget. If such authorization be secured, the lowest bidder, to whom a partial contract has been awarded, will be directed to proceed with the entire project.

An Outstanding Need

Attention has been called to the overcrowded condition of the dining hall and the necessity for taking the only auditorium of the college for additional dining-room space. The auditorium is not large enough to accommodate the present student-body, and in view of the need for additional dining-room space, the only feasible plan seems to be to devote this hall entirely to dining hall purposes as a permanent arrangement. It must be recognized that it is a great handicap to the college not to have an auditorium where its students may be assembled frequently during the year for various purposes. In fact, such a hall is considered to be indispensable at all colleges, and even high schools. It cannot be too strongly urged, therefore, that a suitable auditorium is an outstanding building need of this institution, and should be supplied at the earliest possible date.

In planning an auditorium, future as well as present needs should be considered. Within the next two or three years the normal increase in student enrolment will mean at least 1,800 students here, with about 400 staff members, and probably at least 800 townspeople, parents of students, alumni and other friends of the institution, to be accommodated in an auditorium. Within a ten-year period there can be no question that this total number will be increased to at least 3,500, and surely ten years is not too far to look ahead in providing a building of this type in an institution such as this one.

The only social service center on our campus is the Y. M. C. A., and its building is comparatively small and greatly overtaxed. Recently a thorough survey was made as to this side of our campus life, and this is very convincing that one of our greatest needs is an adequate social service building. It has, therefore, occurred to me that our best plan would be to provide a combined auditorium and social service building. This would naturally be an expensive project, the most ambitious we have attempted, but I am inclined to think it would be more economical than to erect two buildings.

Faculty Salaries

In the application of our present scale for salary increases it has been customary to apply it automatically and almost without variation on a basis of length of service. It seems desirable that future salary increases shall be based upon merit rather than merely upon the number of years an individual has occupied a position. This merit basis would, of course, include such factors as better preparation through graduate study, research, etc., and the efficiency shown, results produced, etc., in the position.

Biennial Budget Of Requests, 1930-32

The budget of requests for the biennium 1930-32 was submitted to the Governor prior to September 15, 1929. As is well known, the budget of this institution is voluminous and involved. For this reason an attempt has been made to analyze and summarize it in the tables which form a part of this report. These tables relate to the college proper, as the budgets of the Agricultural Experiment Station and Agricultural Extension Division were presented separately by their respective directors.

Table I -- Summary of Biennial Budget Requested for 1930-32

(Compared with preceding biennium)

(1)

Function
(2)
Requested
Totals

1928-30
(3)
Estimated
Revenue

1928-30
(4)
Net State
Appropr’n
Requested
1928-30
(5)
Requested
Totals

1930-32
(6)
Estimated
Revenue

1930-32
(7)
Net State
Appropr’n
Requested
1930-32
Administration$  89,032  $  2,200  $  86,832  $  119,870  $  2,800  $  117,070  
Agriculture218,330  27,000  191,330  296,730  22,000  274,730  
S. H. Agriculture30,730  23,000  7,730  39,540  24,000  15,540  
Engineering229,400  2,600  226,800  368,430  2,550  365,880  
Mechanic Arts78,250  10,000  68,250  60,460  11,600  48,860  
Printing65,120  47,000  18,120  78,070  56,270  21,800  
Academic-Science265,350  2,400  262,950  357,320  2,200  355,120  
Military20,150  1,200  18,950  21,200  1,200  20,000  
Summer Quarter23,750  22,620  1,130  29,350  15,200  14,150  
Library30,250  13,200  17,050  53,200  15,200  38,000  
Hospital51,650  24,400  27,250  35,540  26,300  9,240  
Dining Hall316,882  350,200  (*)33,318  365,400  380,000  (*)14,600  
Tailor Shop98,950  100,000  (*) 1,050  114,300  114,400  (*) 100  
Laundry36,850  47,000  (*)10,150  36,750  50,000  (*)13,250  
Farm61,450  13,200  48,250  24,600  10,000  14,600  
Dairy Husbandry63,524  2,200  61,324  35,650  1,600  34,050  
Animal Husbandry27,350  7,000  20,350  27,400  6,000  21,400  
Creamery34,650  39,600  (*) 4,950  29,205  18,000  11,205  
Heating, and Power Plant451,659  400  451,259  149,850  200  149,650  
Electric Service33,550  39,200  (*) 5,650  35,000  48,000  (*)13,000  
Plumbing, Sewerage, Water65,100  5,000  60,100  55,750  3,600  52,150  
Buildings and Grounds979,230  19,000  960,230  1,470,880  12,000  1,458,880  
Sinking Funds46,680  42,680  4,000  91,680  60,000  31,680  
State Loan Fund11,600  ……  11,600  11,600  ……  11,600  
Unallocated Fees……  193,720  (*)193,720  ……  253,000  (*)253,000  
Federal Funds.……  107,984  (*)107,984  ……  96,000  (*) 96,000  
Total$3,329,487  $1,142,804  †$2,186,683  $3,907,775  $1,232,120  $2,675,655

*These amounts representing profit or unallocated credits are to be deducted from the amount requested.
†The amount appropriated was $1,242,535, of which 5400,000 was loaned under the Noell Act plan.

Table II -- Capital Outlay and Special Items in Requested Budget, 1930-32

(Amounts include both years)

Repairs: 
  General Repairs to Buildings and Grounds$ 24,000  
  Special Repairs in Five Old Barrack Buildings10,000  
  Repairs to Basement of Academic Building No. 13,000  
  Repairs to Basement of Academic Building No. 22,000  
  Repairs to Roads and Walks6,000  $45,000  
Remodelling and Minor Additions: 
  Baths and Closets in Five Old Barrack Buildings$ 12,000  
  Dairy Barn Improvements5,250  
  Moving and Resetting Three Faculty Residences7,500  
  Library Building Improvements10,000  
  Poultry Structures and Equipment5,000  
  Coal Storage and Equipment5,000  
  Remodelling and Fireproofing Dining Hall45,000  89,750  
Departmental Equipment: 
  Agricultural$ 19,725  
  Engineering47,935  
  Sciences23,700  
  Mechanic Arts2,075  
  Printing9,570  
  Library10,000  
  Hospital2,900  
  Dining Hall10,000  
  Laundry4,000  
  Electric Service10,000  
  Motor Trucks5,000  
  Patton Engineering Hall10,000  154,905  
Utilities: 
  Reservoir$ 30,000  
  Heating Extensions40,000  
  Sewers and Drainage20,000  
  Hardsurfacing and Constructing Roads and Walks15,000  
  Fire Protection Apparatus10,000  115,000  
Major Building Projects: 
  Completion of Davidson Hall 
   —4th Story South Elevation$ 27,000  
  —Rear 1/4 of Laboratory Section19,000  
  —2-Story North Elevation45,000  
  —Annex (Physics)100,000  
  —Equipment Additions24,000  215,000  
  Completion of Dormitory No. 8 — top floor 25,000  
  Dairy Products Building and Equipment 150,000  
  Horticultural Laboratories Equipment 30,000  
  Auditorium to seat 3,500 persons 400,000  
  Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 50,000  
  Agricultural Engineering Laboratory 30,000  
  Service Building, Storage, etc. 20,000  
  Agricultural Departments Building and Equipment 150,000  
  Academic Building and Equipment 200,000  
  Veterinary Hospital and Equipment 30,000  
Land: 
  Orchard Land and Structures 15,000  
  Campus Grading and Planting 10,000  
   $1,729,655  

Support Of The Budget

One of the most encouraging events of our experience, in my estimation, was the meeting here of a group of leaders representing the large agricultural organizations and interests of Virginia. This committee was appointed by the Agricultural Conference Board of Virginia, an organization consisting of officially designated representatives of the various agricultural commodity organizations and the other farm organizations of our state. The purpose was to go over with us the budget of requests we were to present to the governor for the coming biennium for the various activities of this institution in all of its departments and divisions, not merely those of an agricultural type, altho those are of course of primary concern to this group. An entire day was given to an explanation and discussion of these budget matters. I feel most grateful for this added interest in our institution and its service to the people of our state.

In this connection, it may be of interest to call attention to the action of the Board of Directors of our General Alumni Association. This board met in Richmond on September 20, and was attended by the following members:

E. W. Allen, vice-president in charge of engineering, General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y.; E. P. Waller, manager railway department, General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y.; Donaldson Brown, vice-president in charge of finance, General Motors Corporation, New York City; J. Thompson Brown, vice-president duPont-de Nemours Company, Wilmington, Delaware; Gordon Lefebvre, vice-president in charge of operation, Oakland Motor Car Company, Pontiac, Michigan; J. B. Huffard, vice-president in charge of purchases, Union Carbide and Carbon Company, New York City; W. E. Wine, president Wine Railway Appliance Company, Toledo, Ohio; C. K. Payne, vice-president Kanawha National Bank, Charleston, West Virginia; F. P. Turner, principal assistant engineer, Norfolk and Western Railway Company, Roanoke, Virginia; Lawrence Priddy, insurance, New York City; D. G. Robson, cotton linter, Memphis, Tennessee.

This board had a conference with the governor, and endeavored to impress upon him the necessity for increasing the salary schedule at the institution in order that the highest type of professional and technical men might be secured and held on our various staffs. The following resolutions were adopted and presented to the governor:

“WHEREAS, it is deemed of the greatest importance for Virginia to maintain a high order of education available for her sons, to the end that the state may continue to enjoy its preeminent position in the contribution of man-power to the industrial and economic progress of the country; and,

“WHEREAS, the contribution of V. P. I. to this cause has been outstanding as applying in directions in which the institution is particularly equipped; as, for example, agriculture, engineering in the several branches, and applied science; and,

“WHEREAS, recent observations have given to this Board of Directors of the Alumni Association convincing evidence of the high quality of service being performed at V. P. I. under the present administration; and,

“WHEREAS, it seems imperative that increases of salaries be allowed for the teaching staff so that a suitable quality of professors and assistants can be maintained; and,

“WHEREAS, it seems of almost equal importance that the equipment be extended, particularly in the engineering departments, so that the facilities offered at V. P. I. may be more nearly in line with the standards afforded by the higher grade of institutions outside of the state of Virginia,

“THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Alumni Association record its approval and hearty support of the present administration of V. P. I.; and,

“FURTHER RESOLVED that there be conveyed to the governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia our earnest appeal for favorable consideration of the biennial budget submitted by V. P. I. for the years 1930-32.”

Attention is especially directed to the personnel of this alumni board. It would be difficult to assemble a more impressive group, particularly from the industrial and commercial standpoint. Attention has been called to the representative agricultural group which came to the college in June and went over with us the portions of the budget of requests relating to the agricultural phases of the institution. An institution is indeed fortunate when it can enlist the active interest of such men as compose these two groups. We are deeply appreciative of their efforts in our behalf.

The Biennial Budget As Approved

The biennial budget for 1930-32 as recommended by the governor and passed by the General Assembly contains the following amounts for this institution:

Table III -- Appropriations

 Mar.-June ’301930-311931-32
College:    
  Operation$291,629  $ 945,425  $940,740  
  Capital Outlays270,000  230 000  ……
      Total$561,629  $1,175,425  $940,740  
  Less College Revenue183,730  620,060  620,060  
  State Appropriation$377,899  $ 555,365  $320,680  
  State Loan for Capital Outlay……  37,000  ……  
Extension Division:    
  Operation$154,830  $ 464,495  $466,795  
  Capital Outlays335  1,000  1,000  
      Total$155,165  $ 465,495  $467,795  
  Less Federal Appropriation  76,232  228,695  230,995  
  State Appropriation  $ 78,933  $ 236,800  $236,800  
Experiment Station:    
  Operation  $ 56,830  $ 188,220  $188,320  
  Capital Outlays  1,600  13,250  9,150  
      Total$ 58,430  $ 201,470  $197,470  
  Less Station Revenue  25,000  100,000  100,000  
  State Appropriation  $ 33,430  $ 101,470  $ 97,470  

Compared with the state appropriations for the 1928-30 biennium these recommendations are as follows:

Table IV -- Comparison of Appropriations

 1928-301930-32Increase
College:    
  Operation$1,697,435  $1,886,165  $188,730  
  Capital Outlays279,730  500,000  220,270  
      Total$1,977,165  $2,386,165  $409,000  
  Less College Revenue1,134,630  1,240,120  105,490  
  State Appropriations$ 842,535  $1,146,045  $303,510  
  State Loans C. O.400,000  37,000  ……  
Extension Division:    
  Total$ 768,000  $ 931,290  $163,290  
  Less Federal Appropriation  372,000  459,690  87,690  
  State Appropriations  $ 396,000  $ 471,600  $ 75,600  
Experiment Station:    
  Total$ 348,010  $ 398,940  $ 50,930  
  Less Station Revenue  182,330  200,000  17,670  
  State Appropriation  $ 165,680  $ 198,940  $ 33,260  

From the tables it is to be noted that, crediting our institutional revenue against the amounts allowed for operation shows an increase of $83,240 for the biennium in the state appropriation allowed for operation. The increase in the state appropriation for capital outlays is $220,270, not including the amount loaned for capital outlays in 1928-30. In the last biennium we were allowed to borrow from the literary fund $400,000, while for the new biennium we are allowed $37,000 by such loans. Because of this the actual total available for capital outlays during 1930-32 is $142,730 less than the total which was available in 1928-30.

The following are the more important special items included in the recommended budget:

Table V -- Special Items

Dairy Products Building and Equipment$150,000  
Physics Building100,000  
Completion of Davidson Hall74,000  
Mechanical Engineering Laboratory50,000  
Agricultural Engineering Laboratory30,000  
Departmental Equipment-70,000  
Heating Extensions10,000  
Sewers and Drainage10,000  
Grading, Construction of Walks, and Planting6,000  
Repairs to Basement Academic Building No.13,000  
Repairs to Basement Academic Building No. 22,000  
Creamery Equipment Replacements1,225  
General Repairs to Buildings and Grounds (28 months)28,000  
Special Repairs to Barrack Buildings10,000  
Baths and Closets in Barracks12,000  
Insurance (28 months)14,000  
Land Rent (28 months)4,671  
Sinking Funds32,180  
Interest on Bonds and Loan Certificates (28 months)70,040  
Student Loan Fund (28 months), including repayments12,000  
Completing Dormitory (Loan authorized)25,000  
Improvements in Barracks (Loan authorized)12,500  

The increase in the state appropriation for operation of the college is about ten per cent over the 1928-30 biennium; while the increases for the Agricultural Experiment Station and the Agricultural Extension Division are each about twenty per cent. The college increase does little more than enable us to proceed on our present program; but the increases for the other two divisions will permit substantial enlargement of the work. The governor stated that he had in mind, in increasing the latter two amounts, provision for carrying out the recommendations of the State Agricultural Commission, and it is gratifying to know that substantial progress may be made in this direction of our research and extension activities.

   

University Club The University Club House -- Completed, 1929

   

Power Plant The Power Plant -- Placed in Operation, 1930

 

Finances And Business Management

Financial statements covering the year closed February 28, 1930, are presented; and from these it will be seen that the institution closed its last budget year in excellent financial condition. We have operated well within our income, and at the same time have paid for the completion of Patton Engineering Hall out of our own revenues during the year to an amount of approximately $40,000. During the ten years of the present administration we have never had to go to the governor or the General Assembly with a deficit, yet we have been able to use for capital outlays a comparatively large amount of our own revenues from sources other than the state treasury. We always operate on a safe margin and have a good working balance at the end of each year.

Tables VI and VII give financial and business statements concerning the year closed February 28, 1930.

Table VIII is a financial statement for the year 1929-30 arranged to include the interdepartmental business as well as the regular budget items, as a basis for the proposed budget for tho) year beginning July 1, 1930.

A consolidated balance sheet as at February 28, 1930, is presented in Table IX. This shows an increase of $254,578 in our assets and an increase of $242,102 in unencumbered investment in physical plant, as compared with the preceding year.

Table X is a financial statement for the period of four months which intervened between the close of the last fiscal year, February 28, and the beginning of the newly adopted fiscal year, July 1. Hereafter the budget year will extend from July 1 in each year through June 30 of the succeeding year.

Table VI -- Financial Statement for the Year March 1, 1929-February 28, 1930

(For regular budget only-not including interdepartmental)

(1)

Function
(2)
Total
Receipts
1929-30
(3)
Accounts
Receivable
Mar. 1/30
(4)
Total
Revenue
1929-30
(5)
Disburse-
ments
1929-30
(6)
Accounts
Payable
Mar. 1/30
(7)
Total
Expdt’rs.
1929-30
Administration  $ 1,901  ……  $ 1,901  $ 46,453  $ 373  $ 46,826  
Agriculture12,409  ……  12,409  78,491  2,530  81,021  
S. H. Agriculture8,043  $ 1,500  9,543  14,370  18  14,388  
Engineering1,195  ……  1,195  114,577  954  115,531  
Mechanic Arts5,621  167  5,788  28,838  1,449  30,287  
Printing28,905  1,916  30,821  38,838  166  39,004  
Academic-Science1,658  ……  1,658  129,788  680  130,468  
Military654  ……  654  9,275  463  9,738  
Summer Quarter8,531  ……  8,531  11,746  ……  11,746  
Library7,979  ……  7,979  13,570  76  13,646  
Hospital13,852  ……  13,852  38,572  214  38,786  
Dining Hall199,990  ……  199,990  161,439  3,126  164,565  
Tailor Shop59,133  ……  59,133  45,515  108  45,623  
Laundry26,981  ……  26,981  16,485  ……  16,485  
Farm6,502  ……  6,502  9,543  20  9,563  
Dairy Husbandry2,039  ……  2,039  19,871  19  19,890  
Animal Husbandry3,477  75  3,552  14,465  42  14,507  
Creamery12,341  819  13,160  14,586  ……  14,586  
Heating, and Power plant1  ……  1  43,151  500  43,651  
Electric Service24,190  19  24,209  13,026  121  13,147  
Plumbing, Sewerage and Water3,286  714  4,000  27,431  61  27,492  
Buildings and Grounds9,078  ……  9,078  141,927  49  141,976  
I. & S. F. Noell20,282  ……  20,282  44,786  ……  44,786  
I. & S. F. 96-00……  ……  ……  1,000  ……  1,000  
Student Loan Fund……  ……  ……  1,500  ……  1,500  
Fees Unallocated134,576  ……  134,576   ……   ……   ……  
College Departments$ 592,624  $ 5,210  $ 597,834  $1,079,243  $ 10,969  $1,090,212  
Balance Mar. 1/2960,903  ……  60,903  ……   ……  ……  
Federal Appropriation33,333  ……  33,333  ……  16,970  16,970  
Land Grant Funds17,233  ……  17,233  ……  ……  ……  
State Appropriation442,270  ……  442,270   ……  ……   ……  
Gross Balance Mar. 1/30……  67,120  ……  67,120  ……   ……  
Net Balance Mar. 1/30……  ……  ……  ……  44,391  44,391  
Total$1,146,363 
(A)
$ 72,330 
(B)
$1,151,573 
(C)
$1,146,363 
(A)
$ 72,330 
(B)
$1,151,573 
(C)

(A) Total receipts (column 2) exceeded total disbursements (column 5) by 567,120, the gross balance on March 1, 1930.
(B) Accounts receivable and gross balance on hand March 1, 1930 (column 3) exceed accounts payable (including $16,970 of federal funds paid in advance and reserved for expenditure March 1-June 30, 1930) by $44,391, which is the net balance on hand March 1, 1930 (column 6).
(C) Total disbursements, accounts payable and federal funds reserved, for 1929-30 (column 7) amount to less than the total revenue (column 4) by $44,391, which is the net balance on hand March 1, 1930.

Table VII -- Business Statement for the Year March 1, 1929-February 28, 1930

(For regular budget only-not including interdepartmental)

(1)

Function
(2)
Accounts
Receivable
Mar. 1/29
(3)
Total
Receipts
1929-30
(4)
Accounts
Receivable
Mar. 1/30
(5)
Net Rev.
Produced
1929-30
(6)
Supplies
Inventory
Mar. 1/29
(7)
Supplies
Inventory
Mar. 1/30
Administration  ……  $ 1,901  ……  $ 1,901  ……  ……  
Agriculture……  12,409  ……  12,409  422  977  
S. H. Agriculture$ 1,234  8,043  1,500  8,309  ……  ……  
Engineering……  1,195  ……  1,195  ……  ……  
Mechanic Arts……  5,621  167  5,788  7,715  7,195  
Printing……  28,905  1,916  30,821  2,250  3,326  
Academic-Science……  1,658  ……  1,658  ……  ……  
Military……  654  ……  654  ……  ……  
Summer Quarter……  8,531  ……  8,531  ……  ……  
Library……  7,979  ……  7,979  ……  ……  
Hospital……  13,852  ……  13,852  ……  ……  
Dining Hall……  199,990  ……  199,990  5,210  7,336  
Tailor Shop……  59,133  ……  59,133  21,925  21,135  
Laundry……  26,981  ……  26,981  270  612  
Farm151  6,502  ……  6,351  2,700  2,532  
Dairy Husbandry……  2,039  ……  2,039  1,381  869  
Animal Husbandry……  3,477  75  3,552  648  320  
Creamery221  12,341  819  12,939  1,065  136  
Heating, and Power plant……  1  ……  1  1,900  3,305  
Electric Service……  24,190  19  24,209  2,350  2,450  
Plumbing, Sewerage and Water1,267  3,286  714  2,733  331  400  
Buildings and Grounds1,628  9,078  ……  7,450  2,325  3,312  
I. & S. F. Noell……  20,282  ……  20,282  ……  ……  
I. & S. F. 96-00……  ……  ……  ……  ……  ……  
Student Loan Fund……  ……  ……  ……  ……  ……  
Fees Unallocated……   134,576  ……  134,576   ……   ……  
Total$ 4,501  $ 592,624  $ 5,210  $ 593,333  $ 50,492  $ 53,905  

The net revenue produced in 1929-30 (column 5) is the total receipts (column 3) less the accounts receivable at the beginning of the year (column 2) plus the accounts receivable at the end of the year (column 4).
The inventory (columns 6 and 7) includes only supplies on hand for early consumption and nothing of a permanent nature, thus being essentially the same as ca8h on band for operation, and it might be properly included in the gross balance in Table II. This, therefore, is a substantial working margin, or reserve.

Table VIII -- Financial Statement for the Year March 1, 1929-February 28, 1930

(Including interdepartmental transactions)

(1)

Function
(2)
Actual
Receipts
Regular
(3)
Actual
Receipts
Interdeptl
(4)
Total
Actual
Receipts
(5)
Actual
Expdt’rs.
Regular
(6)
Actual
Expdt’rs.
Interdeptl
(7)
Total
Actual
Expdt’rs.
Administration$ 1,901  $ 416  $ 2,317  $ 46,453  $ 11,708  $ 58,161  
Agriculture12,409  154  12,563  78,491  3,367  81,858  
S. H. Agriculture8,043  ……  8,043  14,370  769  15,139  
Engineering1,195  29  1,224  114,577  3,949  118,526  
Mechanic Arts5,621  7,237  12,858  28,838  8,002  36,840  
Printing28,905  12,887  41,792  38,838  828  39,666  
Academic-Science1,658  120  1,778  129,788  774  130,562  
Military654  ……  654  9,275  580  9,855  
Summer Quarter8,531  ……  8,531  11,746  47  11,793  
Library7,979  ……  7,979  13,570  1,459  15,029  
Hospital13,852  ……  13,852  38,572  743  39,315  
Dining Hall199,990  2,089  202,079  161,439  27,775  189,214  
Tailor Shop59,133  4  59,137  45,515  718  46,233  
Laundry26,981  847  27,828  16,485  8,788  25,273  
Farm6,502  4,915  11,417  9,543  125  9,668  
Dairy Husbandry2,039  11,777  13,816  19,871  8,324  28,195  
Animal Husbandry3,477  ……  3,477  14,465  942  15,407  
Creamery12,341  17,837  30,178  14,586  13,721  28,307  
Heating, and Power plant1  24,623  24,624  43,151  801  43,952  
Electric Service24,190  13,527  37,717  13,026  10,575  23,601  
Plumbing, Sewerage and Water3,286  1,625  4,911  27,431  117  27,548  
Buildings and Grounds9,078  7,861  16,939  141,927  2,406  144,333  
I. & S. F. Noell20,282  ……  20,282  44,786  ……  44,786  
I. & S. F. 96-00……  ……  ……  1,000  ……  1,000  
Student Loan Fund……  ……  ……  1,500  ……  1,500  
Fees Unallocated134,576  570  135,146   ……   ……   ……  
College Departments$ 592,624  $ 106,518  $ 699,142  $1,079,243  $ 106,518  $1,185,761  
Balance Mar. 1, 192960,903  ……  60,903  ……   ……  ……  
Federal Appropriation33,333  ……  33,333  ……  ……  ……  
Land Grant Funds17,233  ……  17,233  ……  ……  ……  
State Appropriation442,270  ……  442,270   ……  ……   ……  
Gross Balance Mar. 1, 1930……  ……  ……  67,120  ……  67,120  
Total$1,146,363 
(A)
$ 106,518 
(B)
$1,252,881 
(A & B)
$1,146,363 
(A)
$ 106,518 
(B)
$1,252,881 
(A & B)

This table is similar to Table VI but includes also the interdepartmental transactions, and is put here in different form in order to furnish a basis for the budget for the year beginning July 1, 1930, as shown in Table XIII. It is to be considered in connection with Table XI, which represents the budget for the four months March I-June 30, 1930, the period between the old budget year and the beginning of the new budget year.

Table IX -- Consolidated Balance Sheet-As at February 28, 1930

(Exclusive of Agricultural Experiment Station and Agricultural Extension Division)

ASSETS
I. Current:
 Cash in hands of Treasurer   $67,120
 Imprest Cash:
  Student Loans$29,354
  Workmen’s Compensation18,21347,567
 Accounts Receivable: 5,210
 Supplies Inventory   53,905  $173,802
    
II. Endowment:
 From Land Grant Act of Congress,  344,312
III. Funded Debt:
 Buildings and Equipment Sinking Funds  30,685
IV. Physical Plant:
 Land (731 acres at $400 average) $292,400
 Buildings$3,200,000
  Less Depreciation Reserve, 10%320,000  2,880,000
 Central Heat Distribution System$ 100,000
  Less Depreciation Reserve, 3%3,00097,000
 
 Electric Service Distribution System$ 27,000
  Less Depreciation Reserve, 10%2,70024,300
 
 Water Supply System$ 32,000
  Less Depreciation Reserve, 10%3,20028,800
 
 Sewerage System$ 111,000
  Less Depreciation Reserve, 25%3,330107,670
 
 Departmental Equipment and Library$ 918,507
  Less Depreciation Reserve, 5%45,925872,582
 Livestock 54,0004,356,752
 
   $4,905,551
LIABILITIES
I. Current:
 Reserve for Imprest Cash $47,567
 Reserve for Accounts Payable, etc. 27,939
 Reserve for Supplies 53,905 
 
 Reserve for Allocation in 1930-31 44,391$173,802
 
II. Endowment:
 Reserve for Land Grant Fund  344,312
III. Funded Debt:
 Buildings and Equipment Bonds, 1900  75,000
IV. Physical Plant:
 Debt on Black Farm $17,176
 Balance Owing on Professors’ Houses 11,894
 Borrowed under the Noell Act Plan 623,564
 Equity of Town in Sewage Disposal Plant49,021
 Unencumbered Investment in Physical Plant 3,610,7824,312,437
   $4,905,551

Table X -- Financial Statement for the Period March 1-June 30, 1930

(Including interdepartmental transactions)

(1)

Function
(2)
Actual
Receipts
Regular
(3)
Actual
Receipts
Interdeptl
(4)
Total
Actual
Receipts
(5)
Actual
Expdt’rs.
Regular
(6)
Actual
Expdt’rs.
Interdeptl
(7)
Total
Actual
Expdt’rs.
Administration$ 1,408  $ 131  $ 1,539  $ 17,185  $ 3,484  $ 20,669  
Agriculture4,489  35  4,524  26,529  799  27,328  
S. H. Agriculture5,306  ……  5,306  5,559  114  5,673  
Engineering140  ……  150  40,132  195  40,327  
Mechanic Arts1,481  344  1,825  7,525  2,561  10,086  
Printing15,628  2,851  18,479  10,846  199  11,045  
Academic-Science50  3  53  45,226  120  45,346  
Military5  ……  5  3,718  76  3,794  
Summer Quarter……  ……  ……  100  201  301  
Library2,727  ……  2,727  4,787  278  5,065  
Hospital4,518  ……  4,518  4,756  300  5,056  
Dining Hall57,169  1,610  58,779  50,939  10,356  61,295  
Tailor Shop2,382  ……  2,382  15,947  242  16,189  
Laundry8,402  184  8,586  5,036  2,799  7,835  
Farm739  780  1,519  4,249  12  4,261  
Dairy Husbandry589  5,079  5,668  4,478  772  5,250  
Animal Husbandry351  ……  351  4,206  240  4,446  
Creamery4,073  7,573  11,646  5,263  5,563  10,826  
Heating, and Power Plant……  7,359  7,359  12,811  100  12,911  
Electric Service8,052  4,289  12,341  3,444  2,669  6,113  
Plumbing, Sewerage and Water950  420  1,370  2,920  5  2,925  
Buildings and Grounds4,190  916  5,106  29,675  489  30,164  
I. &: S. F. Noell7,697  ……  7,697  ……  …….  ……  
I. &: S. F. 96-00……  ……  ……  1,875  ……  1,875  
Student Loan Fund……  ……  ……  ……  ……  ……  
Fees Unallocated40,627  ……  40,627  ……  ……  ……  
Equipment Unallocated……  ……  ……  5,023  ……  5,023  
College Departments$ 170,984  $ 31,574  $ 202,558  $ 312,229  $ 31,574  $ 343,803  
Balance Mar. 1, 193067,120  ……  67,120  ……  ……  ……  
Federal Appropriation1,112  ……  1,112  ……  ……  ……  
Land Grant Funds……  ……  ……  ……  ……  ……  
State Appropriation377,899  ……  377,899  ……  ……  ……  
Gross Balance July 1, 1930……  ……  ……  304,886  ……  304,886  
Total$ 617,115  
(A)
$ 31,574  
(B)
$ 648,689  
(A & B)
$ 617,115  
(A)
$ 31,574  
(B)
$ 648,689  
(A & B)

This table is similar to Table VIII, and is made to cover the transition period of four months between the end of former fiscal years and the beginning of the newly adopted fiscal year.

Working Budget For 1930-31

The working budget for the period beginning March 1, 1930, is presented in unusual form. The state changed its budget year to begin July 1 instead of March 1 each year, hence it became necessary to make two budgets, one for the four months from March 1, 1930 through June 30, 1930, and the other from July 1, 1930 through June 30, 1931.

The working budget for the four months period, March 1 - June 30, 1930, is presented in Tables XI and XII. The footnotes explain these tables, particularly with respect to the balances.

The working budget for the year beginning July 1, 1930 is presented in Tables XIII and XIV. Special attention is called to the footnote for Table XIII. This indicates that it is proposed to hold in reserve two per cent of the entire amount estimated as revenue for the year, as protection against over-expenditure or shortage in receipts other than from state appropriations.

The capital outlay items which are provided conditionally in the appropriations made by the General Assembly are omitted from this budget. These items are all for purposes specifically designated in the appropriations act, hence if they are secured it is merely a matter of following the law.

Table XI -- Summary of Budget for the Four Months March 1-June 30, 1930

(1)

Function
(2)
Actual
Receipts
Regular
(3)
Actual
Receipts
Interdeptl
(4)
Total Expd.
Allocations
Regular
(5)
Accounts
Payable
Mar. 1/30
(6)
New Expd.
Allocations
Interdeptl
(7)
Total
Actual
Expdt’rs.
Administration  $ 100  $ 100  16,783  $ 373  $ 3,600  $ 20,756  
Agriculture4,500  40  23,986  2,530  1,000  27,516  
S. H. Agriculture2,500  ……  5,350  18  200  5,568  
Engineering……  10  52,890  954  400  54,244  
Mechanic Arts1,250  1,500  7,918  1,449  2,530  11,897  
Printing10,000  4,000  10,300  166  245  10,711  
Academic-Science100  40  46,365  680  165  47,210  
Military10  ……  3,058  463  175  3,696  
Summer Quarter3,300  ……  100  ……  15  115  
Library2,500  ……  4,437  76  250  4,763  
Hospital4,200  ……  4,325  214  230  4,769  
Dining Hall58,000  600  50,100  3,126  8,800  62,026  
Tailor Shop3,000  ……  9,100  108  225  9,433  
Laundry8,000  200  5,210  ……  2,810  8,020  
Farm650  1,000  2,600  20  35  2,655  
Dairy Husbandry500  3,000  3,425  19  1,375  4,819  
Animal Husbandry800  ……  3,255  42  275  3,572  
Creamery3,000  5,000  4,100  ……  3,550  7,650  
Heating, and Power Plant……  8,000  14,400  500  260  15,160  
Electric Service8,000  4,000  3,800  121  3,375  7,296  
Plumbing, Sewerage and Water1,500  400  2,800  61  35  2,896  
Buildings and Grounds3,000  2,000  16,780  49  340  17,169  
I. & S. F. Noell9,500  ……  8,665  ……   ……  8,665  
I. & S. F. 96-00……  ……  1,875  ……  ……  1,875  
Student Loan Fund……  ……  1,000  ……  ……  1,000  
New Buildings……  ……  200,000  ……  ……  200,000  
College Departments$ 124,410  $ 29,890  $ 502,622  $ 10,969  $ 29,890  $ 543,481  
Fees Unallocated42,350  ……  ……  ……  ……  ……  
Federal Funds16,970  ……  ……  ……  ……  ……  
State Appropriation377,899  ……  ……  ……  ……  ……  
Accounts Receivable5,210  ……  ……  ……  ……  ……  
Cash Balance Mar. 1, 193050,150  ……  ……  ……  ……  ……  
Reserve Balance……  ……  103,398  ……  ……  103,398  
Total$ 616,989  
(A & B)
$ 29,890  
(C)
$ 606,020  
(A)
$ 10,969  
(B)
$ 29,890  
(C)
$ 646,879  
(A, B & C)

Amounts in column 2 cover amounts in columns 4 and 5, constituting the regular budget. In column 4 are included the special appropriations of 5150,000 for Dairy Building and 550,000 for Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, $12,400 out of the special appropriation of $70,000 for additional equipment, and $I7,750 from the balance of 144,392 brought over from 1929-30. These amounts together with the accounts payable of 510,969 are covered by the amounts listed in column 2. Columns 3 and 6 are purely interdepartmental transactions and must balance. Column 7 represents total of all estimated expenditures, which are covered by columns 2 and 3. The reserve balance of $I03,398 is made up of 119,156 from operating funds, 157,600 of the 570,000 special appropriation for additional equipment, and $26,642 of the balance of $44,392 brought over from 1929-110.

Table XII -- Allocations for the Four Months March 1-June 30, 1930

(1)

Function
(2)
-A-
Personal
Service
(3)
B-C-D-E

Operation
(4)
E-F
Capital
Outlays
(5)
G-I-J
Fixed
Charges, etc
(6)
Inter-
depart-
mental
(7)
Total
Alloca-
tions
Administration$ 11,823  $ 2,600  $ 2,150  $ 210  $ 3,600  $ 20,383  
Agriculture20,536  2,410  1,000  40  1,000  24,986  
S. H. Agriculture4,480  620  250  ……  200  5,550  
Engineering35,840  1,040  16,000  10  400  53,290  
Mechanic Arts6,333  1,550  25  10  2,530  10,448  
Printing5,000  5,000  300  ……  245  10,545  
Academic-Science43,705  1,150  1,500  10  165  46,530  
Military2,883  150  25  ……  175  3,233  
Summer Quarter……  100  ……  ……  15  115  
Library3,227  405  800  5  250  4,687  
Hospital3,800  495  25  5  230  4,555  
Dining Hall8,000  41,300  500  300  8,800  58,900  
Tailor Shop4,000  5,065  ……  35  225  9,325  
Laundry4,200  840  100  70  2,810  8,020  
Farm1,835  765  ……  ……  35  2,635  
Dairy Husbandry1,500  1,925  ……  ……  1,375  4,800  
Animal Husbandry1,365  1,865  25  ……  275  3,530  
Creamery1,000  3,100  ……  ……  3,550  7,650  
Heating, and Power Plant4,500  9,085  750  65  260  14,660  
Electric Service1,500  1,785  500  15  3,375  7,175  
Plumbing, Sewerage and Water1,500  1,250  50  ……  35  2,835  
Buildings and Grounds8,500  2,100  6,150  30  340  17,120  
I. & S. F. Noell……  ……  ……  8,665  ……  8,665  
I. & S. F. 96-00……  ……  ……  1,875  ……  1,875  
Student Loan Fund……  ……  ……  1,000  ……  1,000  
New Buildings……  ……  200,000  ……  ……  200,000  
Total$ 175,527  $ 84,600  $ 230,150  $ 12,345  $ 29,890  $532,512  

Above amounts are for regular budget except 88 shown in column 6 and included in totala. of column 7.
These allocations are all included in Table X.
A-Salaries, wages, and special payments; B-Repairs, light, heat, power, travel, transportation, communication, printing, etc.; C-Food, fuel, laboratory, office, and other supplies; D-Building, highway, and other materials; E-Office, laboratory, and other equipment (in column 3 for replacements, in column 4 for new additions); F-Buildings and other structures, land and land improvements (pipe-lines, roads, walks, fences, etc.); G-Rent, insurance, and refunds; I-Interest; J-Rotary funds. In column 6 the amounts include a few capital outlay items in addition to the operation items.

Table XIII -- Summary of Budget for the Year July 1, 1930-June 30, 1931

(1)

Function
(2)
Estimated
Receipts
Regular
(3)
Estimated
Receipts
Interdeptl
(4)
Total
Estimated
Receipts
(5)
Expdt’rs.
Allocations
Regular
(6)
Expdt’rs.
Allocations
Interdeptl
(7)
Total
Expdt’rs.
Expdt’rs.
Administration$ 1,800  $ 400  $ 2,200  $ 47,236  $ 12,000  $ 59,236  
Agriculture12,000  150  12,150  94,650  3,500  98,150  
S. H. Agriculture11,260  ……  11,260  15,600  745  16,345  
Engineering1,200  25  1,225  146,350  3,900  150,250  
Mechanic Arta5,000  7,000  12,000  25,148  8,000  33,148  
Printing28,500  12,750  41,250  35,200  800  36,000  
Academic-Science1,500  120  1,620  157,492  750  158,242  
Military600  ……  600  9,048  550  9,598  
Summer Quarter8,500  ……  8,500  11,717  50  11,767  
Library7,900  ……  7,900  13,725  750  14,475  
Hospital13,750  ……  13,750  13,562  750  14,312  
Dining Hall200,000  2,000  202,000  164,550  29,000  193,550  
Tailor Shop59,000  ……  59,000  46,175  750  46,925  
Laundry26,900  800  27,700  16,600  8,800  25,400  
Farm6,500  4,900  11,400  9,700  150  9,850  
Dairy Husbandry1,500  11,750  13,250  10,900  5,000  15,900  
Animal Husbandry3,000  ……  3,000  11,412  950  12,362  
Creamery12,000  17,750  29,750  13,625  13,750  27,375  
Heating, and Power Plant……  24,500  24,500  48,250  800  49,050  
Electric Service24,200  13,500  37,700  10,625  10,600  21,225  
Plumbing, Sewerage and Water3,000  1,600  4,600  9,450  150  9,600  
Buildings and Grounds9,000  7,500  16,500  64,325  3,000  67,325  
I. & S. F. Noell30,000  ……  30,000  41,090  ……  41,090  
I. & S. F. 96-00……  ……  ……  4,750  ……  4,750  
Student Loan Fund……  ……  ……  1,500  ……  1,500  
Fees Unallocated126,500  ……  126,500  ……  ……  ……  
College Departments$ 593,610  $ 104,745  $ 698,355  $1,022,680  $ 104,745  $1,127,425  
Estimated Balance July 1,1930103,398  ……  103,398  ……  ……  ……  
Federal Appropriation33,333  ……  33,333  ……  ……  ……  
Land Grant Fund17,233  ……  17,233  ……  ……  ……  
State Appropriation325,365  ……  325,365  ……  ……  ……  
Estimated Balance June 30, 1931……  ……  ……  50,259  ……  50,259  
Total$1 ,072,939  
(A)
$ 104,745  
(B)
$1,177,684  
(A & B)
$1,072,939  
(A)
$ 104,745  
(B)
$1,177,684  
(A & B)

The estimated balance on July 1, 1930 includes $26,642 unallocated from the balance on March 1, 1930, $57,600 unallocated from the special state appropriation for equipment capital outlays, and $19,156 estimated to be left on hand from the budget for the four months March 1-June 30, 1930, as shown in Table XI.
  The estimated balance on June 30, 1931 includes $28,800 unallocated from the special appropriation for equipment capital outlays and $21,459 general reserve from operating funds. It is to be noted that this latter unallocated amount provides a two per cent reserve to protect against a shortage in receipts or an over expenditure.

Table XIV -- Allocations for the Year July 1, 1930-June 30, 1931

(1)

Function
(2)
-A-
Personal
Service
(3)
B-C-D-E

Operation
(4)
G-I-J
Fixed
Charges,etc
(5)
E-F
Capital
Outlays
(6)
Inter-
depart-
mental
(7)
Total
Alloca-
tions
Administration  $ 35,736  $ 8,800  $ 1,800  $ 900  $12,000  $ 59,236  
Agriculture74,500  11,200  450  8,500  3,500  98,150  
S. H. Agriculture13,500  2,100  ……  ……  745  16,345  
Engineering127,500  5,825  25  13,000  3,900  150,250  
Mechanic Arts19,000  6,000  35  113  8,000  33,148  
Printing17,000  17,350  ……  850  800  36,000  
Academic-Science139,000  6,800  50  11,642  750  158,242  
Military8,010  950  ……  88  550  9,598  
Summer Quarter11,567  150  ……  ……  50  11,767  
Library9,900  1,200  25  2,600  750  14,475  
Hospital11,700  1,750  25  87  750  14,312  
Dining Hall23,500  138,000  1,300  1,750  29,000  193,550  
Tailor Shop12,000  33,375  800  ……  750  46,925  
Laundry13,000  2,950  200  450  8,800  25,400  
Farm5,500  2,200  2,000  ……  150  9,850  
Dairy Husbandry4,500  6,400  ……  ……  5,000  15,900  
Animal Husbandry4,100  6,950  ……  362  950  12,362  
Creamery3,200  10,425  ……  ……  13,750  27,375  
Heating, and Power Plant13,500  27,300  200  7,250  800  49,050  
Electric Service4,700  5,125  50  750  10,600  21,225  
Plumbing, Sewerage and Water4,600  4,675  ……  175  150  9,600  
Buildings and Grounds25,000  26,300  6,100  6,925  3,000  67,325  
I. & S. F. Noell……  ……  41,090  ……  ……  41,090  
I. & S. F. 96-00……  ……  4,750  ……  ……  4,750  
Student Loan Fund……  ……  1,500    ……  1,500  
Total$ 581,013  $ 325,825  $ 60,400  $ 55,442  $ 104,745  $1,127,425  

Above amounts are for Regular Budget except as shown in column 6 and included in totals of column 7. These allocations are all included in Table XIII.
  A -- Salaries, wages, and special payments; B -- Repairs, light, heat, power, travel, transportation, communication, printing, etc.; C -- Food, fuel, laboratory, office, and other supplies; D -- Building, highway, and other materials; E -- Office, laboratory, and other equipment (in column 3 for replacements; in column 5 for new additions); F -- Buildings and other structures, land and land improvements (pipe-lines, roads, walks, fences, etc.); G -- Rent, insurance, and refunds; I -- Interest; J -- Rotary funds. In column 6 the amounts Include a few comparatively small capital outlays, in addition to the operation items which make up moat of the interdepartmental transactions.

State Agricultural Commission Report

Since the report of the State Agricultural Commission contains so many references to the work of the State Agricultural College in its three divisions, I trust that all members of the Board will find it possible to read the entire report. Members of the staff of our Agricultural College rendered valuable service to the commission in the preparation of its report. While many of the recommendations made by the commission apply, at least by implication, to the college, the following apply quite directly:

  1. That instruction in home economics in all its phases be expanded and extended to reach every section of the state, so that information as to how to secure proper standards of living may be generally diffused.
  2. That sufficient funds be provided so that the Agricultural Extension Division will be able to bring the service of a home demonstration agent to every county in the state, and to employ specialists in all phases of home economics for which adequate provision is not now made.
  3. That the home economics department of the State Agricultural College be given sufficient funds to provide equipment and laboratory facilities for the instruction for increased numbers of undergraduate students to prepare for home demonstration work in this state; to offer graduate work in home demonstration for students of other colleges who desire to prepare for home demonstration work in this state; and to offer short practical courses for farm women.
  4. That adequate state funds be provided for the support of research by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station in relation to all rural life problems, and particularly for home economics research.
  5. That the state encourage cooperative marketing by appropriating more liberally for the research in and the teaching of successful cooperative methods.
  6. That the state and federal government help to prevent surplus production by extending outlook information, with appropriations for adequate extension service in farm management and marketing; by agricultural instruction for increased efficiency to promote economical production instead of increased production; and by encouraging orderly marketing through research to determine when, where, and how to sell.
  7. That the state through its various agencies help to dispose of unavoidable surpluses by research to find new uses of farm products.
  8. That the state promote better farm management by teaching farmers and the farm boys to keep farm accounts; by research on costs and profits under different farming systems; by teaching farmers how to adjust production to meet new conditions; by teaching a more intelligent use of agricultural credit; by lowering costs of production through research and education; and by further promotion of diversified farming, particularly for providing the farm family with food from the farm to eliminate handling the transportation costs.
  9. That the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station and the Virginia Agricultural Extension Division prepare and publish a report on Virginia freight rates.
  10. That the importance of producing home supplies on the farm be emphasized through every possible existing agency.
  11. That adequate financial provision be made for continued research in crop and animal production, and in rural economics and social problems; and for taking such information to the farmers as rapidly as it is obtained.
  12. That the soil survey of the state be completed as soon as possible in order to obtain an inventory of our soil resources, and to determine the adaptability of our lands to various crops, forestry, and livestock enterprises.
  13. That educational campaigns be conducted to show how the lands devoted to crops and pasturage should be managed to secure the best results.
  14. That improved forest management be sought through adequate forestry educational and service facilities, including the development of work in wood technology and the addition of a well-organized and equipped department of forestry at the college, where it will fit integrally into the other agricultural education of future farmers and of farm forestry advisers; and the more complete projection of forestry instruction through the agricultural extension service of the state.
  15. That the State Agricultural College and Agricultural Extension Division employ rural electrification specialists so far as may be necessary to carry out the educational recommendations of the report of the Special Joint Committee on Rural Electrification.
  16. That adequate laboratory facilities, including a suitable permanent and well-equipped agricultural engineering building be provided at the State Agricultural College at once.
  17. That farmers be given practical instruction in methods of reducing production costs by the intelligent selection and use of more efficient labor and time-saving machinery, such instruction to be given by properly trained specialists of the Agricultural College and AgriculturalExtension Division in short courses, field demonstration, and personal visits to the farms and farm homes.
  18. That the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station conduct research in farm structures, soil erosion control, farm drainage, irrigation, and labor-saving equipment for the farm, and farm home.
  19. That the necessary funds be provided through state appropriations for conducting the activities included in the foregoing recommendations.
  20. That the Congress should cooperate with the states in providing funds for the further development of extension work in agriculture and home economics; to the end that there shall be a well-trained farm demonstration agent, and a well-trained home demonstration agent in each agricultural county of the United States, in order that the farm people may have the best available information to assist them in their efforts to lower the cost of production, fit production to consumption, improve their methods of marketing and raise their standards of living; the salaries of these extension agents to be paid entirely from state and federal funds; and the said agents to be required to emphasize economic, balanced production and cooperative marketing rather than increased production.

Correlation Of Agencies

Because of its importance especial attention is called to the following chapter of recommendations in the commission’s report. These recommendations are of vital importance to this college:

  1. That service functions and regulatory functions be separated as completely as possible in organization, personnel, and action; and that, if necessary, this be brought about through suitable legislative enactment.
  2. That regulatory functions of an agricultural type be vested only in the State Department of Agriculture.
  3. That educational, instructional, extension, and general service functions of an agricultural type be entrusted to the State Agricultural College; and that all work of this nature now being done by the State Department of Agriculture be transferred to the college as promptly as possible.
  4. That investigational, experimental, and research functions of an agricultural type be assigned entirely to the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station and its sub-stations, together with the Virginia Truck Experiment Station, the latter being limited to activities concerned with trucking.
  5. That the State Forestry Service and the State Agricultural College cooperate, each giving special attention to the functions appropriate to it in accordance with the foregoing general recommendation as to the separation of regulatory and service functions, and as recommended or implied in this report under land utilization and forestry.
  6. That the work of the Agricultural Extension Division of the State Agricultural College and the agricultural education activities of the State Department of Education be so directed as to avoid duplication, each rendering the type of service for which intended, and not encroaching on the proper field of the other.
  7. That the county agents be recognized as the official representatives of the State Agricultural College in their counties; and that requests for technical agricultural information and subject-matter assistance made by, or through the teachers of vocational agriculture in the high schools be submitted to the college through the county agents.
  8. That the State Agricultural College be recognized as the head of the agricultural education system of the state, and that all state agencies which give out agricultural information see that their subject-matter teachings conform to the findings of the agricultural experiment stations in Virginia.

Because of its special importance, it is hoped that members of our Board will read the entire chapter in the commission’s report which gives the reasons and supporting evidence for these recommendations.

It will be recalled that the relations between the Agricultural College and the State Department of Agriculture for many years have been unsatisfactory, and that repeated reference has been made to this, not only by those connected with the college but also by others in no way connected directly with either agency. The commission’s report includes quotations from the report of the Commission on Simplification and Economy, in 1924, and the report of the New York Bureau of Municipal Research, in 1928.

The situation was brought to the attention of the State Board of Agriculture in a formal way during the last year; and this Board appointed a committee of its president together with the commissioner of agriculture to confer with the president of the college and the director of the Agricultural Extension Division, with a view to removing the duplication and difficulties existing in the work of the two agencies. As a result of this effort, an agreement was formulated and signed by the commissioner of agriculture and the president of the college, and it had the approval of the president of the Board of Agriculture.

It was considered advisable that the two Boards confirm this agreement as in accord with the policy of their respective agencies, and thereby give assurance that they will see that the agreement is complied with by the officials of the two agencies concerned.

The agreement, which was signed on January 3, and 4, 1930, respectively, by the commissioner of agriculture and the president of the college, is as follows:

An agreement between the officials of the State Department of Agriculture, Richmond, Virginia, and the State Agricultural College, Blacksburg, Virginia, for the purpose of elimination of duplication in their activities and in the interest of harmony, economy and efficiency.
  1. Both agencies will recognize that educational, research, and in general promotional and developmental activities shall be entrusted to the Agricultural College, and that regulatory activities such as enforcement of laws, establishment of standards and services relating thereto shall be entrusted to the State Department of Agriculture, both agencies making every effort to avoid duplication.
  2. Both agencies will favor a movement to revise the existing laws so as to more clearly define the respective fields of the two agencies and remove duplication of function.
  3. The State Department of Agriculture will limit instruction to the correction of defects that are found in their inspection work referring those concerned to the Agricultural College for educational services.
  4. The State Department of Agriculture will cease designating their inspectors as “instructors.”
  5. The inspectors of the State Department of Agriculture will refer to the Agricultural College requests and needs for plans and other assistance in connection with farm structures, ceasing to render such service from the department.
  6. The state department will limit its publications largely to matters pertaining directly to regulatory work, such as reports of inspections and analyses and market reports. Any educational information as may be published will conform to the findings of the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station. Wherever it is found desirable to include other matter, the manuscript will be submitted to the proper college authorities before publication.
  7. All requests for assistance, and all needs for the same, regarding the set-up of cooperative organizations, will be referred to the college. However, the college, in setting up such organizations will avail itself of any assistance that the state department is in position to give.
  8. There shall be close cooperation between the two agencies in all work related to grading. The instructional part of this work shall be referred to the college. In organizing grading schools there shall be mutual agreement of the two agencies with reference to the details of the work.
  9. The state department will refer all requests for subject-matter information to the extension division of the Agricultural College; as, for example, in the manufacture and processing of dairy products, the breeding, feeding and management of dairy cattle and other livestock, etc.
  10. It is recognized that the division of activities specified under No.1 of this agreement shall also apply to all cooperative work with federal agencies.
  11. The state department will cooperate with the college by requesting educational and service assistance whenever needed in its activities. The college will furnish such assistance whenever possible, and will aid the department in every reasonable way in promoting its regulatory program.
  12. The State Agricultural College agrees that it will be responsible for all educational, promotional and research work relating to agriculture in, and for the development of cooperative organizations and the dairy and creamery industry of Virginia.
  13. The State Department of Agriculture agrees that it will be responsible for the enforcement of all laws, rules and regulations affecting agriculture, and the establishment of standards, grades and services relating thereto.
  14. In case there be a difference of opinion in the interpretation of any part of this agreement, this difference is ·to be referred to the president of the Board of Agriculture and the president of the Board of Visitors of the Agricultural College for settlement, who if unable to agree shall refer their differences to the governor of Virginia for final decision.
  15. It is mutually understood and agreed that the signatories to this agreement will recommend its adoption by the boards of the respective agencies, and that all things herein agreed to are subject to the final adoption and ratification of said boards.

This agreement being signed by the state commissioner of agriculture and immigration, on the one hand, and by the president of this college, on the other hand, it was presented to the State Board of Agriculture and Immigration and to the Board of Visitors of this college, and duly adopted and ratified.

   

Drill and Recreation Field The New Stone Oval -- Drill and Recreation Field

 

State Development Service -- Agricultural

The work of our Agricultural Extension Division is well known throughout the state, and during the past year this work has continued to grow. Increased state and federal appropriations have enabled us to expand this service in various directions. The state budget for the current biennium carries an increase of twenty per cent; and recently Congress provided additional funds from which Virginia will get $33,000 during the current fiscal year. The latter is intended chiefly for employing additional specialists in economics and marketing, and for additional farm and home demonstration agents and their assistants. The emphasis is being placed strongly on the distributing and marketing phases of our agricultural situation. The increase from the state is being devoted so far as possible to carrying out the recommendations of the State Commission to Study the Condition of the Farmers of Virginia. The results from the expansion of our extension service should be quite valuable in the improvement of rural conditions as regards both the farm and home.

The work of our Agricultural Experiment Station, while it has been less well known than the extension service, is meeting with more favor every year, and during the past year it too has made considerable progress. The state budget provides an increase of twenty per cent, and there are also increased federal funds, which have permitted a strengthening of the various departments and the addition of new types of investigation. Special attention is being given to the recommendations of the State Commission to Study the Condition of the Farmers of Virginia, including emphasis on the marketing phases.

In the Agricultural Experiment Station at present, research is being conducted on more than 115 projects, some of which are important to industry as well as to farming; e. g., the recent discovery at this station that goulac and glutrin, trade names for the dry and liquid forms of waste sulphite liquor from paper and pulp mills, can be satisfactorily used in spraying fruit trees for pest control. Outstanding results have been secured in rural electrification. Other projects include tractor tests and other farm machinery studies; nutrition experiments and the production of meat, milk and milk products; investigations in the use of Virginia soft wheat flour, and in the handling and cooking of pork products; development of improved varieties of cereals, higher yielding strains of potatoes, forage crops, tobacco, peanuts, cotton, etc.; long-time fertilizer experiments; the breeding, treatment, packing and marketing of large and small fruits; numerous projects for the control of plant and animal diseases and pests, with special attention to Virginia’s enormous poultry and orchard interests; and a variety of studies covering practically all phases of rural life, and the business of farming in this state. In the recent session of the legislature an act was passed providing for a soil survey of the state, by the Agricultural Experiment Station, and this has been begun in Rockbridge and Grayson Counties.

State Development Service -- Industrial

The rapid industrial and commercial development of Virginia in the last few years has brought to this institution a greatly increased responsibility. It is endeavoring to meet this responsibility through the preparation of students for industrial and commercial leadership, through investigations and experiments of importance to the state’s industrial and commercial interests, and through making information readily available by extension service for those who are engaged in industrial and commercial enterprises in Virginia.

Our Engineering Experiment Station has been active during the past year, and it is now conducting investigations on more than thirty projects. A few of the projects under way or recently completed may be cited to show the type of work done by the institution’s engineering and industrial research division. These include studies, tests, and experiments concerning various building materials, such as native stone, sand, brick, tile, cement, and timber, with a long-time investigation of the effect of storage on hydrated lime; wood impregnation and preservation; veneers, glues, varnishes, and furniture finishes; utilization, and disposal of wastes from woolen mills, tanneries, wood-using plants, etc.; production of rayon; alloys, especially those related to printing; welded joints; gear efficiency; thermal and electrical conductivity; foundry products; road materials; classification of Virginia coals, ash and coking in coals; chemical control of sewage disposal; plumbing, heating, ventilating, and refrigerating equipment problems.

The need for work of this type, particularly for the smaller industries, and the promising possibilities of it in the promotion of the industrial development of Virginia, justify liberal support on the part of the state. When Congress meets in December it is quite probable that the Haugen-McNary bill will be enacted into law. This provides federal appropriations for the partial maintenance of engineering experiment stations at the land grant colleges.

In order to disseminate information obtained by the Engineering Experiment Station and to utilize the technical abilities of the faculty for promotion of the state’s industrial interests, an Engineering Extension Division was established. This is organized in three divisions; bureau of community development, which assists cities and counties by preparing industrial surveys, and by making available engineering advice on developmental projects; bureau of industrial service, which places the resources of the school of engineering at the service of industry for technical advice and information by interview or correspondence; bureau of extension instruction, which offers technical instruction through correspondence study, short courses and institutes, lectures, film and slide service, and bulletins.

In the past eighteen months industrial surveys by the Engineering Extension Division have been completed for one-fourth of the cities and counties of Virginia.

The local and special surveys, investigations and extension service have made such an important contribution to the industrial development of communities surveyed and otherwise served, and of the state at large, that work is now in progress on an industrial survey of the entire state. Much information included in the completed survey will be incorporated in the state survey. It is expected that the published report of the survey will serve as a source-book on the industrial resources of Virginia; will analyze present conditions by studying trends and comparing with other states which have become industrialized; and will suggest the proper direction of Virginia’s future industrial expansion. This statewide industrial survey will be published in appropriate form in cooperation with the Virginia State Chamber of Commerce, the latter organization bearing the cost.

Two statewide commodity surveys have been undertaken by our Engineering Extension Division, one dealing with the wood-using industries and the utilization of our state’s forestry products, and the other dealing with our ceramic industries and the utilization of our state’s clay products. The complete report of the former was published and has been widely distributed, requests being received from some very distant points. One portion of the latter survey has been published, dealing with the physical properties of common and face brick manufactured in Virginia. Samples of ninety-three per cent of the brick manufactured in this state were carefully tested, and it was found beyond all doubt that Virginia brick are well above the average and rank favorably with those produced elsewhere. Many specimens of clay, feldspar, kaolin, sand, etc., are being tested to determine their industrial worth.

Chemical problems arising in the making of rayon are being studied in a specially equipped laboratory, as one of the chemical engineering projects. Another important aspect of chemical engineering is found in the stream pollution studies being conducted in cooperation with the state sanitary engineer. Work is also being done with several industries in an effort to help solve their problems of waste elimination. Methods of treating waste before it is allowed to go into streams, and of converting waste into usable by-products, are phases being given attention.

Short courses have been given at the college and in several cities for contractors and others interested in design and control of concrete mixtures, for electric and other types of metermen, and for plumbing and heating contractors. A number of industrial workers are pursuing studies relating to their work through correspondence. Several members of the staff are cooperating with the State Department of Health in assisting communities to secure suitable water supplies and sewage disposal plants and to operate these plants efficiently.

Our Engineering Extension Division has recently made an arrangement with the Virginia Mechanics Institute, of Richmond, whereby college courses in engineering are to be offered in Richmond under the direction of our college. This appears to be a most fortunate and promising cooperative plan. The rapid development of industry in the Richmond area has brought an urgent need for technical education of college grade in that city and vicinity. This plan will provide means whereby young men of that city and surrounding communities may secure at nominal cost at least one-half of a four-year college training for industrial, commercial, engineering, or scientific pursuits. There are many young men whose limited means will not permit them to go away to college for four years, and these will doubtless welcome the opportunity to live at home, perhaps engaging in gainful employment, and at the same time attend classes for college credit. There are also employers in that area who should find this plan an aid to them in securing technically prepared workers and in increasing the efficiency of their present employes. The plan constitutes a standard junior college of engineering, and a student who completes the two-year program there should be able to graduate at this college in two years. The authorities of the Virginia Mechanics Institute, which has been for seventy-seven years a night school of technology of high grade, have generously placed their handsome and modernly equipped building at our disposal without charge.

We are fully convinced that it is our duty to assist, in every way possible to us, the industrial and commercial development of our state, and to that end we welcome opportunities for establishing contacts which will promote helpful cooperation. The work which we are now doing in this direction, and the new opportunities for service which we have inaugurated in the last few years, are attracting more and more attention, so that it does not seem too much to say that this institution is being looked upon more and more as the chief source for technical assistance in agriculture and industry in Virginia. Progress already made should bring satisfaction to those who have been instrumental in providing the means for the work we are doing; and we have faith that, as new needs arise and greater demands come upon us, in the development of the natural and industrial resources of Virginia, additional means for serving these needs and meeting these demands will be made available for us.

Conclusion

Two points are necessary in measuring progress, and in this respect the point of beginning is as important as the point of attainment. When we look back to the situation in 1920 and compare it with that of 1930, we must recognize that the decade has been a progressive one for this institution. So much remains to be done, so many urgent needs are to be met, and so many opportunities promising rich results are continually being offered to us to serve our state, that it is quite discouraging at times that the resources at our disposal are so limited. Yet what has been achieved should inspire us with hope for the future.

The important consideration now is not what has, or has not been accomplished in the past ten years, but what is to be accomplished in the next ten years. Therefore, our best thought is being devoted to forecasting and planning for the needs and opportunities of 1940. As we set our stake at 1930, we move our objective ten years ahead and reconsecrate ourselves to our high mission.

Respectfully submitted,

Julian A. Burruss, President.

June 30, 1930.