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1921-1922 General Report For The Year

Board Of Visitors

Hon. B. D. Adams having resigned the presidency of the State Board of Agriculture, and Hon. A. J. McMath being elected in his place, the latter became an ex-officio member of this Board early in 1922.

Staff Changes

Resignations And Expiration Of Terms: A. W. Drinkard, Acting Professor of English; H. Gudheim, Associate Professor of Graphics; E. P. Ketchum, Assistant Professor of Military Science; C. H. Pritchard, Assistant Professor of Physics; F. S. Glassett, Instructor in Agronomy; E. H. Gibson, Instructor in Civil Engineering; Owen Marron, Instructor in Military Science; E. L. Traylor, Instructor in Military Science.

Promotions: James Duff, Assistant Professor of English; S. B. Sutton, Assistant Professor of Physical Education.

Appointments: H. Gudheim, Associate Professor of Mathematics; W. G. Wysor, Agronomist, Extension Division; G. P. Warber, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, Specialist in Marketing, Extension Division; Lula V. Walker, Specialist in Home Economics, Extension Division; A. G. Smith, Assistant Professor of Vegetable Gardening, Specialist in Vegetable Gardening, Extension Division; T. W. Knote, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business Administration; L. P. Edwards, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering; F. A. Heacock, Assistant Professor of Engineering Drawing; R. Michel, Assistant Professor of Engineering Drawing; A. W. Fairer, Assistant Professor of Physics; N. D. Gillett, F. R. Lyons, C. L. Hahn, W. P. Hays, Assistant Professors of Military Science and Tactics; Eldona Oliver, Specialist in Home Economics, Extension Division; C. R. Willey, Assistant Entomologist, Experiment Station, (Crop Pest Commission); G. Eppley, Instructor in Vocational Education; F. J. Schneiderhan, Assistant Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station; B. C. Craig, Instructor in Military Science and Tactics; Mary C. McBryde, Instructor in Education; C. T. Huckstep, Instructor in Vocational Drawing; J. S. Glenn, Instructor in Agricultural Engineering, Assistant Agricultural Engineer, Extension Division; H. B. Boynton, Instructor in Agricultural Engineering, Assistant Agricultural Engineer, Extension Division; H. B. Redd, Instructor in Agronomy; J. F. Ryman, Instructor in Physics; J. Cervarich, Instructor in Mathematics; F. W. Floyd, Instructor in Vocational Electricity; Elizabeth Woolwine, Instructor in Education; E. C. Miller, Business Manager.

Student Enrolment

The enrolment for the regular session was 986. In addition to the enrolment in the regular session, the last summer term enrolled 495 and the farmers' winter short course enrolled 15, making a total enrolment for the year of 1,496 students. This of course takes no account of the large number of "extension students." The enrolment for the year has been almost one-fourth larger than for the preceding year, and more than double that of three years ago. Less than six per cent. of the students have come from outside of Virginia. Twelve of the students were women.

Losses by withdrawals during the year have been fewer than usual. A considerable number have been dropped by the college authorities for poor academic or conduct records. The health of the students and college community has been generally good. The crowded condition of the dormitories has not been altogether conducive to study or good behavior, yet the results in these respects have hardly been below the average, altho not all that we should like to have. .

A census of the enrolment of the present session shows that at least 67% of all our students are partly or wholly self-supporting. Approximately 150 students are given aid by the college, and others work for outside parties. The kind of employment is varied, including waiting in the dining-hall, milking, cleaning stables, firing furnaces, and performing janitorial duties.

Student Activities

The various student activities have prospered during the year. The honor system has been well administered, as a whole, and the students deserve high commendation for their efforts in this connection. It is worthy of note that, for the first time in fourteen years, the two literary societies put on a public program at Commencement this year, and it proved to be a very creditable program. These societies, which have been practically dead for many years, have after three years of effort to revive them apparently taken on new life and their future is promising. It is greatly regretted that it became necessary to deprive them of their halls in order to provide additional classrooms, and it is hoped that a way will be found to provide other halls soon, as otherwise it will be difficult to keep up the proper interest in this important work. The technical societies have also prospered during the year.

As an indication that religious ideals are not lacking and that they function in the student-life of this state college, contrary to the reports that over-zealous supporters of non-state institutions sometimes put out, it may be noted that: (1) over 95% of the members of the faculty are church members; (2) about 75% of all students are church members; (3) about 30% of the students attend Sunday school regularly and entirely voluntarily; (4) about 70% of all students are members of the Y. M. C. A.; (5) about 50% of all students are enrolled in Bible study and mission classes, with an attendance of about 75% of the enrolment; and (6) twenty or more students have been conducting regularly prayer meetings and Sunday school in nearby districts.

Expenses Of Students

A study of the official charges at the various institutions for the past session shows conclusively that the expense of attendance at this college is less than at any of the other colleges in Virginia. However, in view of the fact that it is our policy to reduce the cost of attendance to the lowest safe figure, a revision of the charges is proposed. It is especially desirable to change the plan of payment. The college changed from the two-term to the three-term plan fifteen years ago, yet the business office has continued to collect its fees on the old two-term plan, which is neither equitable for the student nor good business for the college.

The following revision of the charges to students and of the regulations for payments were adopted for the coming college year:

 

"The following charges are payable by all undergraduate men students, at the beginning of each term, except that day students do not pay for room, board, and laundry:

 1st Term2d Term3d TermSessionNOW
Registration$10  $10  $10  $30  $15  
Library1  1  1  3  2  
Laboratory4  4  4  12  10  
Physical Culture2  2  2  6  5  
Infirmary4  4  4  12  9  
Room (heat. light. janitor)14  13  13  40  40  
Board in Dining Hall68  58  58  184  193.20  
Laundry6  5  5  16  16.50  
Contingent (returnable)7  …  …  7  7  
 $116  $97  $97  $310  $297.70  

 

"Students not holding State Scholarships must pay $30 a term for tuition, or $90 for the session, in addition to the above totals.

"The registration fee is $10 for each term, but if a student registers in person, pays all his fees and other charges for the term, and attends the required duties, before the office closing-hour on the first day of the term, he will be given a rebate of $5, thus reducing the registration fee for the term.

"The contingent deposit of $7 is payable when the student registers for the first time during any session. After charging against it the cost of damage to property, or loss of equipment, caused by the student, and the pro-rated portion of unfixed damage or loss, the balance, if any, is returned to the student or his parent, but in no case will such payments be made to others. If in any case the damage or loss exceeds the amount of the contingent deposit, the student will be required to pay the balance, or he may be required to make also an additional deposit."

Cadets must be supplied with a complete uniform outfit, the total cost of which will be $105.00 instead of the present amount of $101.00, but it will include a uniform pair of shoes costing $6.00, thus representing a reduction of total cost.

It has been authorized that the wives, sons, and daughters of members of the faculty be permitted to register for classwork in the college without the payment of the usual fees, but to be subject to other regulations for the admission of students.

The loan funds of the college are in better condition than ever before by reason of the increased appropriations; but the entire available amount is assigned early each year and it is impossible to meet all of the demands for help from this source. The applications for employment are so great that such positions as are available have to be assigned by terms of three months rather than by years, to enable as many as possible to benefit by them.

It is a pleasure to announce that the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company has established two scholarships, one for a boy and the other for a girl member of the extension division clubs in the territory thru which their road runs.

Administration Of Instruction

The entrance requirements have been steadily raised. Three years ago a student could enter with twelve high school units. For the coming session fifteen units of high school work, without conditions, will be required, and the applicant must be a graduate of an accredited school, or else he must take entrance examinations. The removal of conditional entrance is the last step in the process of raising the entrance requirements, and there is nothing further to be done in this direction to make the institution standard with other colleges, universities, and technical schools.

A new curriculum in agricultural engineering has been arranged for the coming session, to meet increasing demands. Such a program presents a re-grouping of courses already offered in the several departments of instruction, with the exception of the department of agricultural engineering itself, and consequently adds nothing to the cost of operation save in the latter department, where expansion is desirable whether or not the proposed curriculum is arranged.

In the mining industry Virginia is chiefly interested in coal mining. Our present mining engineering curriculum is a comprehensive program leaning to metals. It is believed that the needs of the state and the wishes of our students may be more nearly met by offering within the mining engineering curriculum an optional group of courses relating to coal mining. The department of mining engineering is not crowded with work and can undertake the additional courses without adding to the cost of operation. With this in view, a coal-mining option will be offered to students in the second, third, and fourth years of the curriculum in mining engineering, beginning with the coming session.

There is a demand by a small number of applicants each year for a practical course in drawing, mechanic arts, etc. The number would in itself hardly justify the establishment of a curriculum; but recently it has appeared advisable to do this because of the cooperative work with the federal government. As the number of students in the Smith-Hughes teacher-training course in trades and industries increases it becomes difficult to provide sufficient practise-teaching facilities, and the acceptance of students in practical mechanics would supply the additional facilities needed. Moreover, it should help in the rehabilitation of ex-service men sent to us by the Veterans' Bureau. The classes included in the curriculum, with the probable exception of a course in English, can be provided for by the present teaching staff and the practise-teaching students, so that practically no cost would be involved. The curriculum should be administered on the same basis as the present two-year curriculum in practical agriculture. With this in view, a two-year curriculum in practical mechanics will be offered at the beginning of the coming college year.

The new curricula now in effect have been chosen by fair-sized groups and are well established. It is probably not desirable to add further to the curricula for the present, but rather to devote our energies to strengthening those now arranged. No additional or special courses have been provided for women and the small number in attendance are registered in the usual curricula, chiefly applied science.

A complete new system of grading students in their classwork has been adopted by the faculty, including penalties for falling below a prescribed minimum of attainment, and also a revision of the system of honors. The establishment of an honor society and of fellowships and scholarships, have provided valuable incentives for better classwork.

Further revision of the system of keeping the scholastic records of students, and additional clerical assistance in the registration office, are needed. It is purposed to study the situation during the coming year with a view to bettering the conditions as soon as possible.

The requirements for graduate degrees have been thoroly revised, advanced, and clearly defined. This should put our graduate work on an appreciably higher plane and increase the value of such degrees.

Detailed information concerning entrance requirements, contents of curricula, grading system, penalties for unsatisfactory classwork, requirements for honors and degrees, and fellowships and scholarships, is given in the annual catalog.

Progress may be readily found in most of the departments. In some cases lack of adequate facilities for the increased number of students has been a serious handicap.

The military department has maintained its previous high standard and has been given for the fourth successive year a place on the "distinguished college" list by the War Department.

The department of chemistry and practically all of the engineering departments are considerably crowded for space, and additional laboratory facilities are badly needed. It is planned to develop the attic of the science hall for additional space for the chemistry department; but the entire building could be used for this one department without any waste of space whatever. It is also planned to develop the remaining portion of the attic at the agricultural hall for additional space for the department of agricultural chemistry. The engineering departments are badly scattered among the various buildings, and their quarters are exceedingly inadequate. This college has more engineering students than all other institutions in Virginia combined, yet it has no engineering building, and some of its most important work must be conducted in small basement rooms and indeed most of it must be conducted in places poorly suited for such work. The efficient administration of instruction is naturally hindered by such conditions, and better facilities should be provided whether the number of students is further increased or decreased.

Experiment Stations

The agricultural experiment station has maintained its high standard of work, and happily the increased appropriations made by the last General Assembly have enabled it to catch up with its back work and inaugurate plans for expansion. The station is now touching upon and helping the agricultural interests of our state in a more extensive and practical manner, and the people are making use of it and apparently appreciating its value more than ever before.

In a modest way an engineering experiment station has been started, using the facilities of the various engineering departments, and also the departments of mathematics, physics, chemistry, geology, and metallurgy. The first bulletin describing research already accomplished will be issued soon. In cooperation with the United States Bureau of Mines experiments are now in progress concerning the infiltration of air in buildings.

Extension Work

The extension division in agriculture and home economics has continued to improve and extend its work, and it has held its own at a time when practically every other state, in the south at least, has slipped backward. The agricultural interests of our state are calling on this division more and more, and the value of its work cannot be overestimated. It is economically administered, and its finances are in excellent condition. It has been greatly crowded for space for offices, laboratories, etc., for its general and special departments. It is at present using a large amount of space in the agricultural hall, which was never intended to be used for such purposes, and which is badly needed for departments of resident instruction. Moreover, it is very desirable from the standpoint of efficiency that all of the offices of the extension division shall be together under one roof, to the end that the proper supervision may be exercised and time be saved. Since the division, by reason of a balance of funds which has been accumulating little by little thru a period of years, by economical management, is now in possession of at least $50,000 which may be used for building purposes, it is recommended to the Board that steps be taken to erect a building adjoining, and connecting with, agricultural hall, for housing this important and growing division. Such a building will relieve the crowded conditions in agricultural hall to a large extent and will give much-needed additional classroom and laboratory space. [The Board requested the Governor to authorize the use of these funds in this manner, and the request was granted.]

In cooperation with the State Board of Education certain extension courses in teacher-training in trades and industries, under the direction of our department of industrial education, are being conducted in various urban centers of the state. This work is probably destined to grow in the near future, and it gives a point of contact with industry which is needed by the engineering and mechanic arts phases of our college.

The Semi-Centennial

The fiftieth anniversary of the establishment of the college was fittingly celebrated in connection with the annual Commencement, May 28 to 31. The speakers were, for the most part, former students of the college, who have distinguished themselves in various fields of activity, and a special effort was made to get large numbers of alumni to attend. It seems to be generally conceded that the affair was a success. The attendance was large, the programs were for the most part good, and the alumni reunion was altogether creditable and unusual. The enthusiasm of the former students was never so high, and it is believed that much was accomplished in binding together more closely than ever before the alumni and securing their interest and support in the development of the institution. It is also believed that a valuable outcome lies in the unity and harmony of the officials and faculty of the college, indeed of all employes, who gave an excellent example of efficient team-work and ,of what can be accomplished by working together in this way. Incidentally a considerable amount of wholesome advertising was secured, and the attention of the public was attracted in a helpful manner to the work and the possibilities for service of the institution. The arrangements for the large attendance of guests, which have brought much commendation, and for the various programs, were financed almost entirely by the alumni, from whom a large number of small subscriptions for the purpose were obtained. At the alumni meeting, in less than a half-hour, about $72,000 was subscribed to begin a fund for the erection of a memorial hall on the campus. This fund should be greatly increased by continued solicitation of subscriptions.

In connection with this celebration a special bulletin was issued containing a brief history of the college for the fifty-year period. Afterwards another bulletin was published containing a full account of the semi-centennial programs and the addresses delivered.

Business Administration

In former reports reference has been made to the business management of the institution, and it seems advisable to again direct attention to some very important features of the same.

1. Before the budget system went into effect about two years ago, there were certain divisions or departments of the institution which apparently made expenditures without regard to the limitations imposed by their revenues, and every year deficits in these divisions had to be made up by using funds produced in other divisions. It is obvious that this is inequitable, and tends to encourage extravagance and discourage economy and thrift. Every division should stand on its own base, and should be required to keep strictly within its resources, except in serious emergencies. Any surplus resulting in a division should be used for the benefit of that division and not used to cover poor management in some other division. Most of our divisions and departments seem to understand this, but there are still one or two which appear to be not entirely amenable to the requirements of the budget system. It is necessary that we have strict budget control, and there must be sufficient vigilance and firmness in the office of the business manager to prevent expenditures in any division in excess of the authorized amounts. No obligation should be incurred unless authorized beforehand; and this necessitates requisitions for all purchases and all jobs of work, duly approved at the central office, before purchases are made or orders for work are given. Where the head of a division persists in exceeding his authorized allowances and continues to cause deficits, a recommendation will be made to the Board for a change in the management of the division. The repeated warnings which have been given should be all that can be reasonably expected. [The Board by formal action has directed that this be done.]

2. It has been customary for certain divisions or departments to keep their own accounts for sales or services rendered, and to collect in payment for same. This is not good business policy, and all such accounting and the handling of funds of all sorts should be centralized in the office of the business manager of the college. At present there is unnecessary duplication; for example, the experiment station employs a clerk to keep a set of accounts which is merely a duplicate of the accounts kept in the general business office. While there is no suspicion of any misuse of funds whatever, yet it is the best policy for all concerned for all cash which belongs to any division of the institution to be handled by the bonded official, or officials, designated by the Board for this purpose. This should promote economy and efficiency of business administration, and be in every way more businesslike. [The Board directed that this be done, beginning March 1, 1922.]

3. The accounts now kept in the general business office are undoubtedly well-kept. There are still some details of the system which need simplification and revision to make them more modern, but much important revision has been accomplished in the past year. We now have a commendable system of requisitions and thru it much has been accomplished in the way of budget control. We have also succeeded in securing some central administration of our various activities which are of a more or less commercial character. With due regard for what is being done and appreciation for the loyal services of those in charge, it is suggested that our business department would add to its efficiency if it were willing to assume more ultimate responsibility for business affairs in which it has been given full authority, and further that more outside supervision of the business side of the institution is needed. With reference to the latter it may be said that our buildings and grounds are not kept in proper condition, our labor is not as well-managed as it should be, and there are various places in our numerous activities where economies might be effected by close and positive supervision. While fully cognizant, at least in a general way, of these defects, yet the president has felt helpless to undertake the detailed work of correction, knowing that he could not do so without neglecting more important duties; and the head of an institution as large as ours, and with as many large and varied activities as ours, cannot be reasonably expected to assume responsibility for such business details. The only way in which we will ever secure adequate supervision of our business affairs is by the employment of a business manager on a strictly full-time basis, one who will live on the place and take full responsibility for the actual and practical supervision and management of all of the business affairs of the institution, including the physical plant and all of the various activities in which the institution engages. It should be noted especially that we need an "outside" man rather than an "office" man.

The creation of the new position having been authorized by the Board, and an appointment having been made, the new business manager reported for duty May 1, but it has been thought best to transfer responsibilities to him gradually, and he has therefore not yet assumed full charge of what should ultimately be his duties.

How the new office will function remains to be seen. To fully enforce the foregoing suggestions would be a radical departure from long-established practise at this institution, and the job of attempting to do so is both difficult and embarrassing. Recognizing this, the president will continue to give his personal attention and the full weight of his office to these phases of the work until assured that the desired end has been attained.

The Physical Plant

During the year a large amount of work has been done on the grounds and buildings and considerable equipment has been added. A large storage yard with sheds has been provided on the heretofore unused land lying on the northern edge of the campus in the rear of the faculty homes. This has enabled us to remove several unsightly structures from the main campus, to clear away much rubbish, and to operate the grounds and buildings division to better advantage. Many new walks of crushed stone have been laid, the central driveway has been paved, a large amount of sodding has been accomplished, and some planting has been done, so that the grounds in general present a noticeable improvement. An additional athletic field has been graded by the athletic association, and is expected to be in grass and ready for use during the coming term. Numerous additional electric lights have been placed on the campus. The town was authorized by the Board to take a small strip of land near the main entrance for widening the street at the curve.

A much larger amount of repairs than usual has been completed on the various buildings during the past year. Practically every building of general use on the campus has been painted on the outside, and several have been painted on the inside. Several professors' residences also have been repaired and painted. The assembly hall has been painted and otherwise improved. Academic building No. 2 has been remodeled and the space divided to better advantage, altho unfortunately lack of funds has prevented the completion of the plans so as to make the attic available and to put the basement in proper condition. Concrete steps have been constructed at the main entrance to the mechanic arts building. The Y. M. C. A. building has been greatly improved, largely with funds secured from private sources.

The new power plant equipment has been completely installed during the year; and the old engine room has been converted into a laboratory for the department of experimental engineering. The electric distribution system has been considerably improved by changing the outside circuits to a series system, enabling the campus and street lights to be controlled from the central station. A contract for the joint use of poles on the campus by the college and the Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company was authorized by the Board.

The attic of the agricultural hall has been partially finished so as to provide two excellent laboratories for the department of agronomy, this department having given up its former space to the department of agricultural engineering. The greenhouses have been put in repair and a cement floor has been substituted for the former wood floor. The large temporary frame structure for the farm machinery laboratory has been completed and used during the session. A farm repair shop has been built and equipped. The poultry plant has been greatly enlarged and improved, with additional equipment secured from the United States Veterans' Bureau. The general farm improvements have been continued, but are not completed, and indeed will not be for some time to come, inasmuch as a progressive plan for future development has been adopted and we are working to that plan as funds become available. All of the farm structures have been put in repair and completely painted; a new piggery has been constructed; two additions have been erected to the cattle barns; and a large amount of new fencing has been built. The farm plant is being rescued from its long dilapidated and neglected condition, and it is confidently believed that in a short while it will be recognized as a practically new plant and no longer something of which to be ashamed. These improvements should by all means be continued as rapidly as possible; and it should be insisted that those in charge of the farm plant keep it in proper condition in future.

During the summer the kitchen wing of the dining hall will be remodeled to provide additional space and greater economy in serving meals, work being now in progress on this improvement. Some new cooking equipment will necessarily have to be provided, and it is thought that this can be done with funds now available. The hospital will be renovated and considerable improvement made to the interior during the summer; but an addition is badly needed. The half of barrack No. 4 used for many years as apartments for instructors, is being converted back into bed-rooms for students; a cement floor is being laid in place of the wooden floor in front of barrack No. 1; and it is hoped to be able to make certain other much-needed improvements to the dormitories during the summer. The toilet facilities for students in the dormitories is a matter of much concern, and because of the failure to secure the requested appropriation for plumbing it will probably be possible to do comparatively little to remedy the situation. Fire escapes, to comply with the state law, will be erected during the summer on all buildings requiring them, which means practically the entire plant.

The Board has directed that no structure of any sort shall be built in connection with the college residences without the consent of the proper authorities of the college.

The most important problem connected with the improvement of the physical plant at present is the heating and power plant. A special committee of the Board has been appointed to consider this problem with the committee from our engineering faculty. Fundamental questions are involved in this, and it seems inadvisable to proceed until they are, at least in a general way, settled. It appears to be wise to go slowly and carefully, and to take particular pains to provide that whatever is done now will be a unit of the ultimately complete plant, planned to provide for the future growth of the institution, rather than a makeshift as has so frequently been the case in the past. The committee is accumulating a large amount of data, is consulting a number of heating engineers and contractors, and corresponding with several other colleges which have recently faced somewhat similar problems.

The Budget

The November, 1921, number of the bulletin was a "service number," in which an attempt was made to set forth the past, present, and future of the college in its service to the people of the state, particularly with a view to supporting the budget requests pending before the General Assembly. This bulletin has received much favorable comment, and we trust it has done good. Printed in it is an analysis of the budget of requests for the biennium beginning March 1, 1922, for all divisions of the college and its affiliated interests.

The accompanying table shows the appropriations received for the 1922-24 biennium, and compares the same with the appropriations received in the two next preceding biennial periods. It is very gratifying that in every case there is an increase.

Appropriations, Compared with the Two Next Preceding Biennial Periods for the College and Its Affiliated Interests

Object1918-19201920-19221922-1924Increase
over
1918-1920
Increase
over
1920-1922
College$283,216  $481,350  $582,479  106%  23%  
Extension Div168,384  311,364  366,335  118%  18%  
Exper. Station60,000  60,000  103,850  73%  73%  
Crop Pest Com.34,000  37,000  37,480  12%  1%  
Lvstk. San. Bd.25,155  42,740  43,340  72%  1%  
County Stations15,000  16,700  16,700  11%  …  
Truck Exp. Sta.40,000  44,000  49,740  24%  13%  
Totals$625,755  $993,154  $1,199,924  92%  21%  

The Governor's printed budget divides and classifies the amounts allocated to the various divisions and departments of the institution, by functions or services to be performed, for each year of the two-year period. In formulating our working budget for the year 1922-23 we have followed as closely as possible this distribution. While the amounts allowed are far below the amounts needed and requested in most cases, yet we have been provided with funds to advance our activities considerably and make some very important improvements to our physical plant.

It is especially gratifying to note the provision made for the following items: general repairs $20,000; special repairs and remodeling of academic building No. 1, $5,000, of science hall, $2,000, of hospital, $5,000, of dining hall, $2,000, of laundry, $2,000, of library, $2,500, of greenhouses, $1,000, and of farm buildings, $2,000; rehabilitation and extension of central heating system, $51,000; renewing and extension of electric lines, $3,000; laboratory equipment, $13,400; dining hall equipment, $10,500; creamery refrigeration, $4,000; additional livestock, $4,000; and automobile truck, $3,000. Appropriations were made to cover the deficit caused by the influenza epidemic, $3,820; and the deficit caused by the advance in the cost of coal, $21,000.

Summer Activities

The college is by no means idle thru the summer months. The summer school of six weeks has been made an integral portion of the college year, and plans are under consideration for extending this to a full quarter of twelve weeks in 1923. In addition to the summer school, from June 19 to July 29, the following activities have been already arranged for during the summer this year: June 19-June 23—agricultural high school teachers' conference; June 19-July 1—industrial conference for foremen and managers in factories; June 28-June 30—annual meeting of the American Association of Agricultural Editors of the United States; July 6-July 8—agricultural conference of the United States Veterans' Bureau; July 13-July 14—Virginia State Veterinary Medicine Association; July 31-August 5—boys and girls' clubs short course; August 9-August 11—Virginia State Farmers' Institute.

Conclusion

A number of more or less important matters are pending, but we are not yet ready to make recommendations concerning them. Among the more important of these are the question of limiting the enrolment of students until additional dormitories and laboratory space can be provided; a change in the laboratory supplies fee; the establishment of a student activities fee; and the centralization of repair shops and other utilities.

During the year several special committees of the Board have rendered especially valuable service in connection with: the beef-cattle project; the heating system; the mess; the animal husbandry, dairy husbandry, and farm departments; insurance; and the remodeling of the dining hall, infirmary, and library. This service is much appreciated.


1919-1929 Reports

Early President's Reports were published in bulletins, with multiple reports in each bulletin. Note that the original spelling of many words (enrolment, remodelling, etc.) has been retained.

1930-1931 Report

Introduction

General Report of the President

Reports of

The Dean of the College

The Dean of Agriculture

The Dean of Engineering

The Chairman of the Summer Quarter

The Committee on Graduate Programs and Degrees

The Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station

The Director of the Engineering Experiment Station

The Director of the Agricultural Extension Division

The Director of the Engineering Extension Division

The Librarian

The Adviser to Women Students

The Health Officer

The Secretary of the Young Men’s Christian Association

Statistical Tables

Statistics of Enrolment and Graduation

Summary of Treasurer’s Reports

1929-1930 Report

Introduction

General Report of the President

Reports of

The Dean of the College

The Dean of Agriculture

The Dean of Engineering

The Chairman of the Summer Quarter

The Committee on Graduate Programs and Degrees

The Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station

The Director of the Engineering Experiment Station

The Director of the Agricultural Extension Division

The Director of the Engineering Extension Division

The Librarian

The Adviser to Women Students

The Health Officer

The Secretary of the Young Men’s Christian Association

Statistical Tables

Statistics of Enrolment and Graduation

Summary of Treasurer’s Reports

1927-1928, 1928-1929 Reports

Introduction

1927-1928 -- General Report

1928-1929 -- General Report

Appendix

Enrolment Statistics

Summary of Treasurer's Reports

1925-26, 1926-27 Reports

1925-1927 Introduction

1925-1926 -- General Report

1926-1927 -- General Report

Appendix

Appointments, Tenure, and Salaries

Vacations, Office Hours, Records, etc.

Enrolment Statistics

Summary of Treasurer's Reports

1919-1925 Reports

Index

Introduction

1919-1920 Report

Preliminary Statement

First General Report

Second General Report

Special Report on Instruction

Special Report on Organization

1920-1921—General Report For The Year

1921-1922—General Report For The Year

1922-1923—General Report For The Year

1923-1924—General Report For The Year

1924-1925—General Report For The Year

Enrolment Statistics

Summary of Treasurer's Reports